Hans Zoell

 Zoell 1961 CIAC Group Shot Hans Zoell

 

images/Hans Zoell issues final UNO magazine Coin World October 1968 Hans Zoell Numismatic Scrapbook Magazine February 1960

1899 Ten Cents Small 9s Are You Missing Something

Simpliffied Catalog Variety Catalog

Phila-Coin Company Phila-Coin Company

Canadian Coin Variety Catalog Hans Zoell 1st Edition - 12.5 Mb

Canadian Coin Variety Catalog Hans Zoell 2nd Edition - 47 Mb

Canada Major Coin Varieties Hans Zoell Third Edition Part One - 15 Mb

Canada Minor Coin Varieties Hans Zoell Third Edition Part Two 1965-1966 - 45.8 Mb

Canada Major Coin Varieties Hans Zoell Fourth Edition 1966-1967 - 16.7 Mb

Canada Minor Coin Varieties Hans Zoell Fifth Edition - 1970 - 13.9 Mb

Unusual Canadian Coins

No. 1 (November 1965) ­to No. 8 June ; renamed Unusual Numismatic Objects starting with No. 9 (September 1966).
The FIRST and exclusive magazine devoted to the “UNUSUAL” in the Canadian  decimal coinage.
Published monthly (except July and August) at 1907 S. Railway, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.
PUBLISHER: Hans Zoell, Member: CNA, ANA, CNVCA, CONE, RCDA and RCC .
EDITOR: J. Wray Eltom
Associate Editor: Barrie Renwick
ADVERTISING: E. Kadannek
CIRCULATION: Carl Sonne
ILLUSTRATIONS: H. and B. Zoell
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: One Year $2.00; Two Years 3.50; Five Years $5.00.

Unusual Canadian Coins 1965 No 1 November - 7.3 Mb

Unusual Canadian Coins 1965 No 2 December - 6.9 Mb

Unusual Canadian Coins 1966 No 3 January - 9.5 Mb

Unusual Canadian Coins 1966 No 4 February - 9.5 Mb

Unusual Canadian Coins 1966 No 5 March - 10.1 Mb

Unusual Canadian Coins 1966 No 7 May - 11.4 Mb

Unusual Canadian Coins 1966 No 8 June - 12.9 Mb

Unusual Numismatic Objects 1966 No 9 September - 13.8 Mb

Unusual Numismatic Objects 1966 No 10 October - 11.6 Mb

Unusual Numismatic Objects 1966 No 11 November - 9.4 Mb

Unusual Numismatic Objects 1966 No 12 December - 13.1 Mb

Unusual Numismatic Objects 1967 No 13 January - 1.6 Mb

Unusual Numismatic Objects 1967 No 14 February - 11.8 Mb

Unusual Numismatic Objects 1967 No 15 March - 11.6 Mb

Unusual Numismatic Objects 1967 No 16-17 April-May - 12.7 Mb

Unusual Numismatic Objects 1967 No 18 June - 12.3 Mb

Unusual Numismatic Objects 1967 No 19-20 September-October - 10.7 Mb

Unusual Numismatic Objects 1967 No 21-22 November-December - 10.6 Mb

Unusual Numismatic Objects 1968 No 23-24 January-February - 15.5 Mb

The Kayak

From Vol. 1 No. 1 January 1971:
TEMPORARY EXECUTIVE of CIAC
Bill English , Chairman
John Regitko, Vice Chairman
Bob Aaron, Secretary & Publicity
Ralph Trimble, Treasurer
Peter Elliott, Membership Chmn.
Mrs. Joanne Regitko, Coresponding Scty.
Hans Zoell, Editor - Publisher
January 1971
DIRECTORS
Paul Car!
Edward Coyne
James Eremko
Max McKinnon
Jack Wallace
Mrs. Lil. Zant
Edited and published monthly for the benefit of its members, the "Coin Irregularity Association of Canada". A non profit organization, established for the sole purpose to promote the collecting and studying irregular coinage and to assist the collector of such unusual objects in all its aspects.

EDITORIAL
Many of you will be a little surprised when you receive your first copy of the "KAYAK". It is the official publication of a newly established organization, named "Coin Irregularity Association of Canada". The initials "CIAC" to sound like kayak when spoken- a truly Canadian sound, easy to remember.
It was found necessary to establish this new organization, mainly because of the badly deteriorated and neglected earlier organization. Since its members did not receive hardly anything of benefit, most of them dropped out or resigned. Their floundering monthly publication failed to bring anything worth while to its members. These members craved for information and educational material, so essential in this field of collecting.
So far, over $300.00 in donations have been received and pledges of a similar amount have been made. This is very encouraging, showing that there is great interest in the promotion of an organization willing to give an honest helping hand to its fellow collectors in the field of irregular numismatics, especially since there are so many unscrupulously manufactured fakes on the market.
This publication will come to you FREE of charge for three issues, January, February and March. It is our sincere hope that, by the time you have received the March issue, you will be convinced that it is to your advantage to join this new organization (CIAC), and make use of the enclosed application form.

An Introduction to the Canadian Numismatic Variety Collectors Association 1965

The Kayak Vol 1 No 1 January 1971

The Kayak Vol 1 No 2 February 1971

The Kayak Vol 1 No 3 March 1971

The Kayak Vol 1 No 4 April 1971

The Kayak Vol 1 No 5 May 1971

The Kayak Vol 1 No 6-7 June-July 1971

The Kayak Vol 1 No 8-9 Aug-Sep 1971

The Kayak Vol 1 No 10 October 1971

The Kayak Vol 1 No 11 November 1971

The Kayak Vol 1 No 12 December 1971

The Kayak Vol 2 No 1 January 1972

The Kayak Vol 2 No 2 February 1972

The Kayak Vol 2 No 3 March 1972

The Kayak Vol 2 No 4 April 1972

HANS ZOELL

May 20, 1906 – December 23, 1982
“Dean of Canadian Numismatics,” “Dean of Die Variety and Error Collectors,”
“The Father of Canadian Variety Collecting,” “The Father of Canadian Irregularity Collecting”

Hans Zoell wrote a “Short Biography” in Unusual Canadian Coins No. 8 (June 1966). This “bio” has been reprinted and rewritten a half dozen times. Zoell’s “story” should be much more than what he published back in 1966. His early insights, publications and contributions go way beyond this 1966 bio...
Entries from the Canadian Numismatic Bibliography edited by Darryl A. Atchison, F.C.N.R.S.
ZOELL, HANS
First edition 1961 variety catalogue of Canadian coins : fully illustrated and priced. – 1st ed. – Regina : Hobby Publishing and Manufacturing, 1961. – 40 p., ill.
First edition 1961 variety catalogue of Canadian coins : fully illustrated and priced. – 1st ed. : second printing. – Regina : Hobby Publishing and Manufacturing, 1961. – 40 p., ill.
Canada coin variety catalog : fully illustrated and priced. – 2nd ed. – Regina : Hobby Publishing and Manufacturing, 1962 - 63. – 120 p., ill.
Canada major coin varieties including Newfoundland. – 3rd ed. : part one. – Regina : Hobby Publishing and Manufacturing, 1965. – 48 p., ill.
Canada minor coin varieties. – 3rd ed. : part two. – Regina : Hobby Publishing and Manufacturing, 1965. – 156 p., ill.
Canada major coin varieties. – 4th ed. – Regina : Hobby Publishing and Manufacturing, 1966. – 102 p., ill.
Simplified catalogue of Canadian, Newfoundland coins and paper money. – 2nd ed. – Regina : Hobby Publishing and Manufacturing, 1962. – 40 p., ill.
Simplified catalogue of Canadian, Newfoundland coins and paper money : including New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. – 3rd ed. – Regina : Hobby Publishing and Manufacturing, 1963 - 1964 - 40 p., ill.
Simplified catalogue of Canadian, Newfoundland coins and paper money. – 4th ed. – Regina : Hobby Publishing and Manufacturing, 1965. – 48 p., ill.
“Wrong view on Canadian coins” –Kayak: Vol. 1, no. 1 (Jan. 1971). – p. 5. – comments concerning an article published in Numismatic News (Dec. 1, 1970) entitled “Pricing Canadian Coins” concerning the pricing of Canadian error coins
“Re-entry, re-cut, die-shift, deterioration” –Kayak: Vol. 1, no. 3 (March 1971). – p. 42 - 43. – article discussing the difference between these often-confused terms which are all associated with multiple die strikes resulting in distinctive doubling errors
“Double-sided uniface coins” –Kayak: Vol. 1, no. 6 - 7 (June - July. 1971). – p. 94. – discusses the legitimate and counterfeit production of uniface coins
“Re-entry, re-cut, re-shift, deterioration” – The CN Journal : Vol. 19, no. 11 (Dec. 1974). – p. 384 - 385. – an explanation of how various die varieties come to exist as a result of anomalies in die production or other minting processes
ZOELL, HANS ; FORBES, JACK
Canada minor coin varieties. – 4th ed. – Regina : Hobby Publishing and Manufacturing, 1968. – 102 p., ill.
Canada minor coin varieties. – 5th ed. – Regina : Hobby Publishing and Manufacturing, 1970. – 56 p., ill.
ZOELL, HANS ; TANNAHILL, CECIL C. ; RENWICK, BARRIE
Simplified grading guide for the coins of Canada and Newfoundland. – Regina : Hobby Publishing, 1965. – 48 p., ill
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The CN Journal Vol. 1 No. 7 (July 1956) p. 147
New Members
1167 ZOELL, Hans, P. O. Box 123, Regina, Sask.
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The CN Journal Vol. 02N06June1957.pdf     page 109
Editor's Page
Since the Canadian Numismatic Association is very much indebted to friends in Regina, Saskatchewan, for providing us with initial supplies of the new C.N.A. application card, we are glad to try and make amends for some misunderstandings in this connection. In a recent letter, Mr. Martin M. Watts says: “The man who deserves as much credit as I on the application cards is Mr. Hans Zoell of the Phila-Coin Company, Regina, who has been very much behind the C.N.A., and printed the cards for me - gratis. A large number of our application cards were sent out by including them with his letters to people on his mailing lists. With reference to President Greene's approval of an initial order for a thousand of these cards, I can obtain the blanks free, and Mr. Zoell has offered to print them for you without charge, so that this order will be forwarded to the General Secretary, Mrs. Graham, with our compliments; perhaps acknowledgment could be made to the Phila-Coin Company, and we hope that they continue to bring in good results.” Needless to say, the Association is most grateful to Mr. Watts and Mr. Zoell for some of the best practical support that our organization has received to date.
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The CN Journal Vol. 05N09September1960.pdf       page 396-7
Editor's Page
Our three hundred and nine guests who registered from all over North America (with three from England!) for the Canadian Numismatic Association's Seventh Annual Convention, August 18-20, found that Sherbrooke is truly Queen City of Quebec Province's beautiful Eastern Townships. Amid forested hills and mountains jewelled with many lovely lakes, ...
...
We were happy to welcome, among the distinguished guests, Messrs. M. Vernon Sheldon (Past President) and C. C. Shroyer (First Vice President) of the American Numismatic Association; David Spink and Peter Seaby of London, England; R. S. Yeoman of the Whitman Publishing Company, Racine, Wisconsin; C. L. Krause, Publisher of the Numismatic News, Iola, Wisconsin; Larry Gingras and Miss Irene Smith from Vancouver, RC.; Martin M. Watts and Hans Zoell of Regina; William Fox Steinberg of Miami, Florida; Gaston DiBello, our constant supporter from Buffalo, N.Y.; C.N.A. Past Presidents G. R. L. Potter and Vincent G. Greene; and many more who came to be with us from near and afar.
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Zoell CNA Life Membership The CN Journal Vol. 05N12December1960.pdf        page 571
LIFE MEMBERSHIPS
L.M.
28        GERBINSKI, Nick, 157 Rupert St., Winnipeg 2, Man.
30        ZOELL, Hans, P.O. Box 123, Regina, Sask.
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Numismatic Scrapbook Magazine February 1960 p. 313
Small "9's" on Canadian Dime
Hans Zoell, Regina, Canada, writes that the 1899 10-cents of that country comes with all the figures in the date of same height (and also with the two 9's being smaller than the "18"). Illustrated is the piece with the small 9's compared with a regular sized date. Mr. Zoell states that from the number of 1899 10-cent pieces he has examined a ratio of one regular date to eight small 9's have been noted.
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The CN Journal Vol. 06N01January1961.pdf
Addenda to “A Bibliogrphy of Canadian Numismatics”       by R.C. Willey
Zoell, Hans - Small 9s on Canadian 10c. (1899). N.S.M., Feb. 1960.
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Coin World January 12, 1961 p. 3
First Edition of Canadian Variety Catalog Sells Out
The new Canadian Coin Variety Catalog, the work of Hans Zoell, of Regina, Saskatchewan, will go into its second printing this month although its author has only started to promote its sale.
Success of the catalog and early sell-out of the first edition was attributed to the long-standing need for such a catalog, coupled with its completeness and excellence of presentation of varieties.
Zoell is manager of the coin department of the Phila-Coin Company, Regina.
Publisher of the fully illustrated volume, bound in heavy stock, is the Hobby Publishing and Manufacturing of Regina.
Arthur Zoel said in connection with the announcement of the second edition that the desire to search for and collect Canadian varieties has seen a steady growth in the past decade.
“Collecting varieties on a large scale is comparatively new and opens up a very large field to the average collector who may find it difficult to improve or complete a collection, either because of scarcity or ability,” Zoell said.
“Many of the listed varieties may be found in circulation and the effort expended will be repaid in the pleasure of building such a a collection,” he continued.
He pointed out varieties appeal to collectors of all ages.
Zoell is anxious to have information regarding varieties not listed in his new catalog, and solicits the, assistance of all numismatists. He asks for a complete description of the unlisted varieties and an opportunity to photograph the coin for future editions of the catalog. Authorities who aided Zoell in the preparation of the first edition include Martin M. Watts, Oliver St. Aubin, Stan. Cowie, Roy Miller, Nick Serniack, C. C. Tannahill, E. B. Kadannek, W. G. Latta, Norman Carlson and S. Meyers.
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The CN Journal Vol. 06N01January1961.pdf
Addenda to “A Bibliogrphy of Canadian Numismatics”       by R.C. Willey
Zoell, Hans - Small 9s on Canadian 10c. (1899). N.S.M., Feb. 1960.
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The CN Journal Vol. 06N03March1961.pdf  page 128
BOOK DONATIONS
Zoell, Hans - Canadian Coin Variety Catalogue. 40 pp. Ill. 1960.
- Copies supplied by the author, and another from A. E. H. Petrie, Ottawa, Ontario.
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The CN Journal Vol. 06N06June1961.pdf     page 303
INTRODUCTORY MAIL BID SALE
Usual Auction rules, coins shipped on open account to C.N.A. members (please quote membership number). If for any reason you are not satisfied return purchase without paying for it.
Closing date June 30, 1961
...
CANADIAN VARIETIES
Hans Zoell's numbers - All VG to F or better
LAKEHEAD COIN AND STAMP EXCHANGE
Members C.N.A. and A.N.A.
180 North Cumberland Street, PORT ARTHUR, Ontario The only Store in the Lakehead devoted to the Collector
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The CN Journal Vol. 06N07and08JulyAugust1961.pdf        page 353
Classified Advertisements
Canadian scarce coin varieties - see Hans Zoell Catalogue: Nickels 1960 187 B “bald” beaver, Unc. $5; special roll 40 $125. 10c. 231 J, point on 1, spot under C, floating ball, Unc. $1.90; special roll $75. 10c. 1889 GOOD - $150. Villeneuve, 1050 Canardiere, Quebec, Que.
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The CN Journal Vol. 06N09September1961.pdf       page 407
Phila-Coin Company Advertisement
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The CN Journal Vol. 07N01January1962.pdf            pages 19-
THE CANADIAN NUMISMATIC ASSOCIATION LIBRARY LIST - January 1962
Zoell, Hans - Canadian Coin Variety Catalogue. 40 pp. Ill. 1960.
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The CN Journal Vol. 07N04April1962.pdf    pages 207
In the CNA Library by A. D. GRAHAM  DONATIONS
VI. From Hans Zoell, Hobby Publishing and Manufacturing, 1907 South Railway, Regina, Saskatchewan:
Simplified Catalog of Canadian, Newfoundland Coins and Paper Money. First Edition. 40 pp. Ill. 1962.
A pocket catalogue for the col1ector of Canadian decimals; with clear illustrations. a fresh approach to grading problems, and the omission of variations.
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The CN Journal Vol. 8 No. 9 (September 1963) p. 389
Simplified Catalogue of Canadian and Newfoundland Coins and Paper Money - By Hans Zoel - Third Edition 1963–64. Published by Hobby Publishing and Manufacturing, Regina. Price 50c.
Mr. Zoel has again made available to collectors his catalogue of the coins, tokens and paper money of Canada, and the provinces. Stripped as it is of all minor varieties and providing considerable information on grading, it is most helpful to the novice collector. Our principal critcism (and one that has been voiced in this column before regarding another catalogue) is that commoner coins have no commercial value in the Good and Very Good condition classifications. The vendor of a collection containing a large percentage of such coins is usually angry when offered only a pittance over face value by a dealer. No quarrel exists with cataloguers who provide such valuations, if it is clearly stated that coins in the lower conditions are in little demand.
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The CN Journal Vol. 08N11November1963.pdf
Ray Miller of Regina has taken over Phila-Coin Company from Hans Zoell and Mrs. E. Kadannek, who have operated the firm for some years. Ray is well known in numismatic circles, and is a frequent attender at Conventions. Hans, his many friends will be glad to know, is continuing his work in the numismatic field, as he and Mrs. Kadannek are continuing to operate Hobby Publishing Company.
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CNA Library Donations: Hans Zoell regularly donated his publications to the CNA Library, as noted in many issues of The CN Journal over the years!
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CNA Donations: Hans Zoell regularly donated money to the CNA, as noted in the Donor section in many issues of The CN Journal over the years!
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The CN Journal Vol. 10N07JulySupplement1965.pdf           page 72
Ad
ARE YOU MISSING SOMETHING?
Let us help you with all the latest information on the UNUSUAL in the Canadian decimal series. Just ask, and we will send latest information.
HOBBY PUBLISHING AND MANUFACTURING
HANS ZOELL, Mgr. C.N.V.C.A.-C.N.A.-A.N.A.
PUBLICATIONS P.O. Box 62 REGINA, SASK., CANADA
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The CN Journal Vol. 10N10October1965.pdf           page 410
Book Reviews
The Simplified Grading Guide for the Coins of Canada and Newfoundland, by Hans Zoell, “assisted by Cec. Tannahill and Barry Renwick. Published by Hobby Publishing & Manufacturing, Regina, Sask. 4" x 6 1/2", Price $1. Available from all dealers, and the author, Hans ZoeIl, P.O. Box 154, Regina, Sask.
This slim, well-printed, pocket-sized book will surely be a 'must' for collectors of the Canadian and Newfoundland decimal series. The authors have done something that would seem almost impossible in the welter of numismatic literature pouring in from all sides - they have succeeded in striking a novel note. The book consists chiefly of excellent photographs of representative coins on which have been indicated in red the areas of wear that correspond to the various numismatic grades familiar to collectors. These are prefaced by five pages of introductory and explanatory text, and the whole forms a practically fool-proof means for precisely grading any degree of wear. We often hear the statement that something “fills a long-felt want”. The new guide definitely falls into this category, and the authors have placed all collectors of our decimal series in their debt. G.R.L.P.
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Unusual Canadian Coins No. 1 (November 1965) ­to No. 8 June; renamed Unusual Numismatic Objects starting with No. 9 (September 1966).
The FIRST and exclusive magazine devoted to the “UNUSUAL” in the Canadian decimal coinage.
Published monthly (except July and August) at 1907 S. Railway, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.
PUBLISHER: Hans Zoell, Member: CNA, ANA, CNVCA, CONE, RCDA and RCC .
EDITOR: J. Wray Eltom
Associate Editor: Barrie Renwick
ADVERTISING: E. Kadannek
CIRCULATION: Carl Sonne
ILLUSTRATIONS: H. and B. Zoell
SUBSCRIPTION RATES: One Year $2.00; Two Years 3.50; Five Years $5.00.
ADVERTIS ING: Display and Classified Rate Card for the asking.
THE COVER Design by Bob Zoell, Los Angeles, California.
THE COIN: A 1964 5¢; piece with a most unusual, unintentionally engraved additional water line at left. This is, without question the most important discovery in decades and appears to be scarce.
THE SIZE: Originally the size of this magazine was planed to be of different size, but after further consultations and discussions, it was decided to do something different, something of an unusual size to fit its title.
EDITORIAL
With the FIRST ISSUE of “UNUSUAL CANADIAN COINS” off the press, after a great struggle and a few days late, you are reading something new and exclusive, designed for the collector interested in the Canadian decimal series.
A great future lies ahead in this type of collecting as it is educational and entertaining without having to disturb your budget.
In future issues we will be having a column devoted to “Collectors' Comments” (letters to the Editor) realizing that both, brickbats and bouquets will fill the space.
As you all know, there are now four different varieties of the 1965 Canadian silver Dollar--so, let's face it--varieties are here to stay.
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Unusual Canadian Coins No. 2 (December 1965) p. 19
Unreasonable Attitude By Hans Zoell
It appears that the people responsible for the recognition of only two of the “Arnprior” dollars are either irresponsible in their profession or they are ignorant of the fact (the latter hard to believe). In 1955 this came into being, when a quantity of silver dollars were especially struck for an Arnprior Factory and it was then discovered that the Vayajeur and Indian were nearly on a dry lake with their canoe. The water lines had almost disappeared, and as a result, the name “Arnprior” was given to this coin struck with a poor, second-hand, mishandled and over-polished or re-surfaced die. The name “Arnprior” is quite appropriate sine it had a connection, but then, later, the 1950 dollar with similar waterline formation was discovered and recognized. What about the 1951 and '52 dollars? Why are they not recognized? They also exist with similar waterline formation. However, the sad part about it is that the child was named before the mother was born. In heavens name, what connection has the 1950 silver dollar with the Town of Arnprior? NONE whatsoever! Why then a “fake” name? Yet, collectors have adopted this blindly without thinking about it, in fact, many collectors don't know the difference.
Now let's see what we have here. Firstly, “the so-called” “Arnprior” is not a variety; secondly, it is only the result of an overused, carelessly re-surfaced die, where the relief portions of the die were polished away, most obvious on the water lines. The pricing of these inferior coins is simply ridiculous as against a coin struck with a carefully prepared die. One may find varying formations of W.L's. on almost all our dollars (excepting short issues and commemoratives) from very strong, sharp and clear W.L's. to very poor and weak. it is possible to make up at least 3 - 4 sets of distinctly different waterline formations of all large issues. Why all this fuss about these particular, inferior coins, when there are many different formations of this type in every issue, from the 1¢ right up, all results of carelessly overused and overpolished dies.
There are many, many beautiful “major” differences to be found in our entire decimal series, which are, for some irreverent reason absolutely ignored by the so-called leading numismatists, especially the professional. Here is just one example: the 1926 low 6, called “near”, near to what? The figure 2 beside it; the rim below or the ML above? Simply confusing to the beginning and novice collector. Calling the two different positions of the 6 on the 5¢ 1926 “high” and “low” is much simpler, because everyone, including children knows the difference between up and down, high or low. Here I was carried away from the subject at hand, but one cannot overlook awkwardness, such as afore mentioned.
The 5¢ 1926 low 6 is the only one recognized in the entire Canadian decimal series, why? When there are many of these variations to be found all through the entire series and many of these are of major proportion in comparison to the 1926 5¢ variety. Recognition of such important and major shifts would create a much larger field to enjoy for both, collector and dealer alike. But, it seems that the majority of professionals ignore the collector, in other words the “consumer”, without which the dealer would be non-existent. Here it appears that the making of a fast buck is the important issue, forgetting that one must properly prepare and sow to expect a good harvest. (More on these subjects in future issues.)
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Unusual Canadian Coins No. 3 (January 1966) p. 1
Birth of MINOR Varieties By Hans Zoell
Frequently, after a period of use, dies ore bound to break down, in some cases earlier and others later. The breaking down die at first reveals only fine hairline breaks, which are not noticed. However, as the pounding continues, these breaks become deeper and wider, and finally quite obvious. This broken-down die is then replaced with a new one. Many coins are found where the obverse differs with the some reverse ‒ in other words, the obverse dies are replaced more frequently, while the reverse die is still in use. It appears that better core is taken with the obverse dies, since there is, as a general rule, a more open field where defects are more readily spotted. it is very interesting and entertaining to study and collect these minor mules as well as the breakdown differences ‒ from the minute hairline, down to the bold and obvious break.
This also applies where, at first, micro dots or spots are noticed which also, due to constant pounding and usage become larger and if not spotted in time, may turn out to be quite large. Another common imperfection is created in the form of patches or islands. These also are small and insignificant at first. Here again, constant pounding will enlarge these spots to the extent where they become patches or islands. This peeling away of the plating is often found to begin around the edges of the recessed portion of the die and has the appearance of the lettering, figures and ornamentation to be “mortar-set”.
Another form of breakdown, referred to as “plugged” characters occurs mostly on letters and figures with complete encirclement, such as: 0's, A's, 4's, etc. The reason for this con be attributed to the non-supported small punches that form the cavity in these letters and figures. These punches will not endure the pounding as well as those that have some support. At first small chips will break away, leaving a small filling in their place on the respective character. As this chipping and breaking continues, these fillings become larger and larger until finally the entire cavity is filled, resulting in a completely plugged character ‒ such as the 1944 and 1946 50¢ pieces (good examples).
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page 15
SORRY - OUT OF No. 1!
After a second run, we thought would be sufficient, is now gone. Most every Subscriber wanted it, besides, many quarters were received to get that 1st edition of “U.C.C.” So, we regret, but are no longer able to supply.
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Unusual Canadian Coins No. 7 (May 1966) p. 8
NUMISMATIC AFFILIATIONS
Anyone interested in the most fascinating hobby of numismatics should join the “Canadian Numismatic Varieties Collectors' Association”
(CNVCA). Membership fee is $5.00 annually - this fee includes; initiation, monthly News Bulletin and as an additional benefit, you receive this magazine (UCC) at a special low subscription rate of only $1.00, annually. Simply cut out application form below, fill in and send to the Secretary, as per address on application form.
If interested in the 'unusual' United States coinage, you should join the oldest and most beneficial organization “Collectors Of Numismatic Errors” (CONE). For further information please see CONE advertisement inside front cover page.
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Unusual Canadian Coins No. 8 (June 1966) pp. 1, 4, 20
AN UNEXPECTED “LET DOWN”
Receiving a nice letter from a fellow collector, living in the U.S.A., to whom I sent complimentary copies of Unusual Canadian Coins, occasionally. He pointed out to me that my writings are not suitable for the better class reader and suggested that I send my articles to him for re-writing.
This I did over three weeks ago, prior to this writing and have not heard from him since, although, he promised me to have them returned within a few days after receipt. Have sent him several telegrams and asked him to at least return originals and answer my wire collect, but nothing. This, I consider an unexpected “let-down”. These articles are concerned with the overresurfacing of dies, including distinct drawings and I feel that an explanation on this subject would be very helpful in numismatics.
I admit, readily, that I am not qualified to write properly in the English language. It is not easy for any person, having been educated in another language, to be perfect in the English language.
SHORT BIOGRAPHY
I was born and raised on a farm in the Rhineland, Germany. We were eleven children in the family, five boys and six girls, myself being the oldest boy. Had to work hard on the farm since I was eight years old. My father wanted me to be a farmer. At sixteen years of age he placed me on a large farm near Cologne, where I spent a year wastefully. Dad realizing this, I went into apprenticeship in the City of Duesseldorf at the age of seventeen, where I made my journeman. I attended night school there, taking up electrical engineering during the four years that I was there, which helped me a great deal, as far as additional education is concerned, but no English.
My mother's sister emigrated to Canada, landing on the day of my birthday (May 20th, 1906). After several requests from my aunt, begging my mother to have one of her children come to Canada, it was decided that I was the one. Landing here in Regina in 1928. I was employed in my profession until 1932, when, as many of you will remember, everything went bad, especially here on the prairies. It was a rarety to see a real clowd, but huge clouds of dust and grasshoppers made the sky dark many times, a sight one cannot forget easily.
At that time no opportunity was given to emigrants to attend night school to help them with the English language.
Nothing much else to do, anywhere, I managed to stay above water - digging gardens, doing carpenter repair work, odd electrical repair jobs, etc. I busied myself making the rounds picking up stamps from offices and building caretakers. This enabled me to accumulate quite a nice stock, selling to wholesale dealers in the U.S. what I considered surplus.
In 1935 I established myself in the Stamp and Supply business. With the stock on hand and my own collection I faired quite well. In 1936 I added my collection of foreign coins to the business. It was possible then to sell foreign coins, but never did any collector ask to see Canadian coins at that time.
Got married in 1938 and raised 4 children; Don and Paul, both employed in the printing trade in Calgary, Bob, a director and supervisor of creative art in Los Angeles and Jeanette happily married in Calgary. Don and Bob are also married - Don with two children, Bob with 3 and Jeanette with two.
Due to the second world war, I was forced to look to other fields for additional income, keeping the stamp business as a sideline. Since all business with Europe, including Great Britain was cut off rather suddenly, I was forced to look to other fields. The opportunity presented itself to purchase a small printing establishment. Although, not having had previous experience in this field, other than watching a friend in this trade, I made out not too badly, the main reason why I am today in the publishing business. All my children got their start and first taste in the printing trade in my shop - Don and Paul as pressmen, Bob doing the photography, lay-out and make-ready work, while Jeanette did corespondence and circular typing.
In 1953 I opened up busines in the hobby line again, including coins. I named it “Phila-Coin Co.” taking in Elizabeth Kadannek as a partner. With too many things to look after, working almost day and night, looking after a printing business, a Coin and Stamp business and making preparations to publish my Variety catalogs, I was taken ill with a stroke and a light heart attack three months later, I was forced to take things a little easier. Sold the coin business 1963 to Roy Miller, who is still operating from the same spot, in the same building where we are located.
We celebrated our 25th anniversary in 1960. To commemorate the event, we issued a simulated Shinplaster, a 25¢ trade token as a gift to all our customers during that year.
Anyone wishing to have one of these simulated Jubilee shinplasters, may have one for the asking and an 8¢ postage stamp.
A HEARTY THANK YOU to everyone having being patient and complimentary towards UCC and I sincerely trust that this attitude will continue in the future. I promise to do the best possible, at least within my ability to satisfy subscribers that have supported and will support my efforts in future.
GOOD LUCK to you all in your numismatic endeavors, hoping to meet many of you at our First annual Convention in November. Until then, I wish to remain your humble servant.
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page 12
Authenticating-Identifying-Appraisal SERVICE!
ATTENTION - COLLECTORS of “UNUSUAL” NUMISMATICS
Having spent years in study and research, to better acquaint myself with the “unusual” in the Canadian decimal series, I am prepared to ably serve in the field of authenticating, identifying and evaluating the 'unusual 1 in Canadian numismatics.
Recognized on this continent as an authority on this subject, a few quotes what others have to say: Mr. Robert Aaron, C.C.N. columnist, says “The Father of Canadian Variety Collecting, etc.”. Canada Coin News writes “Leading Canadian Variety-Oddity coin expert, Hans Zoell, received international publicity on his “Multiple Struck U.S. Lincoln”, etc., etc.”
At a small nominal fee, I am prepared to ably authenticate; identify and evaluate anything in the Canadian and Newfoundland decimal series. Further, important information for the asking.
There are no charges on coins that I may (with your permission) photograph and list in future publications. Contributors of such items will be listed in the different publications, unless instructed not to.
HANS ZOELL                                                          P.O. BOX 154
CNVCA- CNA- ANA- CONE- RCDA                  REGINA, SASK.
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Coin Stamp Antique News December 24, 1966 p. 4
Cale’s Comments: Happy Chanukah
Honorary president HANS ZOELL, Regina, Sask;, had the time of his life when he spent a few days in Toronto after the Canadian variety coin convention. I took him on a tour of Toronto's new City Hall and a visit to all major coin emporiums in town. He was impressed with this display of Eastern hospitality. He charmed the girls in my office in most gallant fashion.
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The CN Journal Vol. 12 No. 1 (January 1967) p. 19
Major Coin Varieties - by Hans Zoell, Fourth edition 1966-1967. Published by Hobby Publishing and Manufacturing, Regina, Saskatchewan. 60 pp. 5 1/2" x 8", extensively illustrated, card cover. Price $2 at all dealers and from the publisher.
With unprecedented interest in Canadian Coin Varieties, especially items of major differences (made by the Mint,) students of Canadian coin varieties will welcome this latest edition with its additional listings.
We acknowledge reference to the C.N.A. and its Journal on page 60.
page 36:
The CN Journal Vol. 12N01January1967.pdf                        page 36
Club News
Canadian Numismatic Variety Collectors Association
The display winners at the first annual C.N.V.C.A. Coin show were:
Canadian Mint Errors:            First-Trophy-G. H. Moore-Gough, Kingston; Second-Ribbon-E. Burns, Toronto
Third-Ribbon-W. Erb, Kitchener
U.S.A. Mint Errors:    First-Trophy-E. A. Coyne, Boston, Mass.; Second-Ribbon-Mrs. C. Ince, Downsview, Ont.
Mint Errors, Foreign:  Second-Ribbon-P. Carl, Rochester, N.Y.; There was only one entry in this class.
Canadian Die-Varieties:          First-Trophy-E. Burns, Toronto, Ont.; Second-Ribbon-W. Thompson, Toronto, Ont.; Third-Ribbon-F. Jewett, Willowdale, Ont.
U.S.A. Die Varieties:  There were no entries in this class
Foreign Die Varieties: First-Trophy-R. Houlton, Toronto, Ont.
Miscellaneous:             First-Trophy-Miss S. English, Waterloo, Ont.; Second-Ribbon-Mrs. M. Hilborn, Brantford; Third-Ribbon-V. Doran, Toronto, Onto
General CNVCA Only:          First-Trophy-W. AlIen, Bronte, Ont.; Second-Ribbon-V. Doran, Toronto, Ont.
Third-Ribbon-R. Morris, Toronto, Ont.
Special awards to members of C.N.V.C.A.:
Presidents Award, awarded to the person who has contributed the most towards the collecting of errors and varieties. This award after due consideration was found to be deservent of being a dual award and considering this most important factor it was judged that Dr. C.A. Herbin, founder of C.N.V.C.A. and Hans Zoell Honorary President of C.N.V.C.A. be co-winners. Congratulations to both Dr. Herbin and Hans Zoell for the most worthy and tireless efforts put forth to promote and further the study and interests in this most fascinating facet of numismatics.
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The CN Journal Vol. 12 No. 1 (January 1967) p. 36
Club News by Betty Lou Bellows
Presidents Award, awarded to the person who has contributed the most towards the collecting of errors and varieties. This award after due consideration was found to be deservent of being a dual award and considering this most important factor it was judged that Dr. C.A. Herbin, founder of C.N.V.C.A. and Hans Zoell Honorary President of C.N.V.C.A. be co-winners. Congratulations to both Dr. Herbin and Hans Zoell for the most worthy and tireless efforts put forth to promote and further the study and interests in this most fascinating facet of numismatics.
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Coin World January 17, 1968
‘Unusual’ Coins Present Ideal Hobby Opportunity
“What is a true hobby?” Hans Zoell,. Regina, Saskatchewan, asks in a recent issue of “Unusual Numismatic Objects.”
ZoelI adds, “Any hobby, no matter what one may fancy to collect or do, must be enjoyable, relaxing, entertaining and educational.”
Discouraging factors in assemblying regular series of coins today, especially for the beginning collector, ZoeIl notes, include shortage of key coins, which are usually available only at high prices and a desire for completeness, which, when not accomplished, brings discouragement and loss of interest to the collector.
“In comparison, it is much easier, more enjoyable and entertaining for the collector who is interested in the 'unusual happenings' in the manufacture of coins. He really enjoys this type of collecting. It is a simple matter to obtain a few rolls (any denomination, except the $1, which, in reality, is not used as change in Canada) of every-day change at face value, and then enjoy himself for many hours, checking and examining these coins, observing and studying their structure, composition and formation. [sic: end quote missing]
“Not only will he enjoy himself, but most important, he will, at the same time, gain valuable knowledge through actual study, research and experience. He arms himself against the unscrupulous that may attempt to sell spurious items, such as has been happening in the past to the unsuspecting numismatist, in fact, to some dealers, as well.”
Zoell concludes, “Numismatic organizations should bear in mind, at all times, that our young generation is the future of numismatics. Give our young folks a helping hand, get them started on this wonderful and worthwhile hobby, and at the same time keep them willfully occupied with something useful, educational and entertaining. It would keep them off the street and out of mischief - a worthwhile endeavor, considering the mischievous undertakings of our young generation today.”
While Zoell's publication emphasizes errors and oddities, especially of Canadian coins, he asks, “please do not send coins where you mistake a scratch for a die crack, a little dirt as a metal filling, or some varnish or nail polish, or other foreign substance as a matallic spot, bump or hump. Neither are ‘squashed-out’ rims wanted, as no two ever will be identical, and therefore cannot be classified as varieties. There are many coins showing weak relief this is caused by over-used and over· polished or over-resurfaced dies and are considered very minor in the field of collecting. In this same category belong the coins with 'fly speck' tiny spots, split hairline die cracks, etc. Do not send such minute imperfections where you must use a strong magnification to find them, as they will not show on photographs.”
Errors and oddities of 1967-dated cents, five-cent, 10-cent coins and the silver dollar, all with the centennial designs, are featured in the Zoell publication.
The bi-monthly publication is available from ZoeIl for $3 per year, in Canadian funds. His address is P. O. Box 62, Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada.
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Coin World October 23, 1968, p. 51
Zoell Issues Final UNO Magazine
The final issue “Unusual Numismatic Objects,” the magazine devoted to varieties, oddities and errors, especially in Canadian coins, has been published by Hans Zoell of Regina, Saskatchewan. Numbered 29 and 30 and dated September-October, 1968, the issue now is in subscribers' hands.
Publisher Hans Zoell has announced that the decision to discontinue publication of the important error journal was prompted by the continued deterioration of his physical health. He said that every attempt will be made to find someone to take over the magazine and continue its regular monthly publication, and expressed some hope that negotiations could get under way at the Canadian Numismatic Variety Collectors Association Convention in Kingston, Ontario, October 19 and 20.
Zoell has virtually singlehandedly blazed the way for the growth of numismatic error collecting in Canada. His two references, “Canada Major Coin Varieties,” and “Canada Minor Coin Varieties,” are recognized as the standards in their fields. He has also authored the “Simplified Grading Guide.”
He earlier announced the sale of all rights to these publications to Charlton Coin and Stamp Co., 92 Jarvis street, Toronto 1, Ontario, Canada. Requests for permission to use copyrighted material in these books, or orders to purchase them, should now be addressed to Charlton.
Zoell said that future editions of the catalog will be published by Charlton, noting that he had promised to help in the preparation and production of these catalogs.
One of the important functions of Unusual Numismatic Objects Magazine has been to serve as a monthly supplement to Zoell's catalogs.
Zoell suffered a stroke in 1963, which caused a slight paralysis of his left side. Though he recovered from the paralysis, he lost the sense of hearing in his left ear, and is unable to maintain his equilibrium when fatigued. Following the stroke, he became a victim of a slight heart attack.
Compromising the advice of his doctor to reduce his busy schedule, he sold the Phila-Coin Co. to Roy Miller at that time, and also discontinued his commercial printing business, retaining only the equipment required to enable him to produce the catalogs and UNO Magazine.
Canada's foremost variety and error specialist has for the last five years been buying time to give to his specialty at the highest possible price. He now must follow his doctor's advice, he says, to “take it very easy and get all the rest you can.”
Image Caption:
Hans Zoell releases final issue of “Unusual Numismatic Objects” Magazine, and announces his retirement from numismatic publishing field.
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The CN Journal Vol. 14 No. 5 May 1969      pages 147 -      [this article has been added here so as to note Haxby’s reference to Zoell in the section: Repunching Variants of the 1858 Large Date Five Cents see+++]
Die Varieties of the Canadian Decimal Coinage of Queen Victoria
IV. Legend and Date Variations and the Date Repunching Variants of the
1858 Large Date Silver Five Cents By J. A. Haxby, C.N.A. 7437 (All rights reserved by the author)
In the three previous papers (17, 29-31) of this series the deliberate alterations of the Canadian decimal coinage effigies of Queen Victoria were outlined. Such variations, that is, those involving the principal design device, form on~ of the two major classes of Victorian die varieties. The other class consists of changes in the date and legends.
That date and legend differences exist and are actually common in the period in question is well known. Reports of Class 11 die varieties fill the Canadian numismatic literature of the 1950's. Some examples are of clear numismatic interest, both for themselves and for what they can teach one about die-making as it was practiced then. Others, in fact most, are in a more questionable category as far as the average collector is concerned and are perhaps better left to the specialist.
In the present paper we shall attempt to give the reader a brief, overall view of the nature of Class 11 varieties, going into extreme detail only for a selected case the date variations of the 1858 large date five cents. Those readers who wish more details are referred to a book, Matrices, Punches and Dies (32), currently in preparation. Where appropriate, results from that work (but not with the documentation to be found therein) are quoted here.
As previously the matrix-punch die nomenclature is employed. Punches, like the coins themselves, have the design raised. They are used for sinking matrices or dies; those that sink the latter are termed working punches. Matrices and dies have the design incuse, but matrices are used solely to raise punches and the dies for the actual striking of the coins. Matrices directly giving rise to working punches are the working matrices.
DIFFERENCES IN THE POSITION OF LETTERS OR DIGITS
In the Victoria period the legends and date did not comprise part of the model for the reducing machine. They were incorporated into the design by being punched (with small hand punches), one letter or digit at a time, into matrices. True positional differences, i.e., those where a character is not newly positioned because one already present was repunched, occur with any frequency only in the final digit or two of the date (40). This is readily understandable in terms of when in the diemaking sequence the various parts of the design were added. The reverse dies for the Canadian issues for a given year usually arose as given below.
Figure 4. Scheme of Derivation for Most Canadian Reverse Dies of the Victoria Period
Master Punch >                                   Working Matrices > Working Punches > Dies
(Bore the first two or three date digits)          (Date Completed)
Thus, the number of positional differences (speaking strictly of true ones) within a given year's coinage reflect the number of working matrices used. Furthermore, unless two different master punches were used the position differences would be restricted to that part of the date punched into the working matrices the final digit or two. In the 1890's, for example, a 2/2 system was mostly used; the 18's were on the master punches and the other two digits punched into the matrices.
The legends are something else. Because they did not have to be changed from year to year, the legends were punched into master matrices. These, compared to their working counterparts, required replacement at much longer intervals. Positioning changes in the legend, then, are seldom seen. When they are the whole legend has usually been redone. The reader should compare the legend associated with 25 cents Portrait 5 (31) to that with the earlier issues.
REPUNCHING
As it took place in the period being considered repunching is a decidedly complex phenomenon. It was performed on both matrices and dies. Most readers can probably recall situations where a letter or digit is composed not of one but of two or more distinct impressions slightly displaced from each other. Rarely it is the result of something other than repunching (e.g. a double-struck die or coin); however, repunching is far and away the most common cause in the Canadian series.
The terms re-engraving and recutting are also used to mean repunching. In all our contributions the latter is used preferentially, because the former two can also be applied to the use of gravers and abrasive tools to make changes by carving or rubbing. Repunching is much more explicit about the process involved. As a result of our study of the subject we find it advantageous to divide repunching into two categories, depending on how the separate impressions compare. If they are alike, simple multiple-punching is said to have occurred. If they differ, one is dealing with overpunching.
Simple multiple-punching is known to most numismatists as its commonest example: double-punching (that is, the character in question is made up of two separate identical impressions). Triple- and quadruple-plmching are also occasionally encountered. When a character is being freshly incorporated into the design, as would be the case in completing the date in a matrix, multiple-punching becomes a frequent reward for carelessness. Rarely does the first blow to a hand punch drive it deeply enough into the steel to give satisfactory relief. In that event the punch is repositioned and given a second blow, and so on. If the engraver were not careful in his repositionings, some of the blows could leave impressions slightly displaced from each other.
Overpunching receives its name from the term overdate, an extreme example. It was practiced apparently for one of two reasons: (a) to repair defective characters in matrices or dies, or (b) to change characters in matrices (and perhaps dies) from one style, size or kind to another.
Overpunching to repair can be readily documented in both matrices and dies for the Canadian series. It sometimes happened (we presume not uncommonly) that with continued use significant deterioration of punches first made its appearance in letters and digits. During at least part of the Victoria period, such punches would still be used for a period of time. The defective characters so introduced into matrices and dies were repaired by being repunched with hand punches. If the positioning of the hand punch were off, doubling would result. In cases where the character already present was larger or distinctly different in some other way from the one on the hand punch, overpunching can be readily detected.
Overpunching to repair a matrix (and a master matrix at that) is illustrated by the 25 cent obverse legends. Comparison of the P. 1 legend with the P. 2-4 one (by the method of “photographic overlaying”-see below) reveals identity except for the placement of a single letter-the I in GRATIA. Closer examination tells us why. Just to the right of the new (P. 2-4) I are traces of the lower half of the original. Presumably what was to become the new P. 2 master matrix was sunk from a punch with the defective GRATIA and the I then repunched.
That defective working punches were used and the dies later repaired is a matter of Mint record. The resultant “punching in” of letters and figures was usually left to the Resident Engraver, an assistant to Wyon. The continual repunching in dies, of course, was accompanied by the risk of picking up and using a grossly inappropriate hand punch. This actually happened on several occasions (32). Eventually, the practice was abolished.
There are a few cases of overpunching in the Canadian series where the intent must have been to change the character or characters already present to another style, size or kind. There can be no question about items like the 1859 cents with the 9 punched over an 8. A much less understood second example, also in the Provincial issues, resides in the large date 1858 five cents to be dealt with later.
ADDITIONAL COMMENTS ON DIFFERENCES IN STYLE, SIZE OR KIND OF LETTERS AND DIGITS
It has just been mentioned how overpunching can create letter or digit varieties of this kind. The other way is simply to use different punches in the original incorporation. The latter assumes importance primarily for that part of the date added to working matrices: the final digit or two. In some years (e.g., the 1858 5c) the date was completed at a matrix stage preceding the working matrices, so even the date did not necessarily experience frequent turnover.
Collectors have long held a difference in even a single letter or figure (especially the latter) in high regard. Some, for example, are willing to pay a sizable premium for the 1893 10 cents with the round-topped 3 as opposed to the flat topped one.
It should be pointed out that such a difference need not have arisen for any but the most trivial of reasons. Blunders, unavailability of previously used punches and inconsistency in the use of punches doubtless all played a part. It is more than slightly difficult for the writer to conceive of any particularly profound significance to the Mint being associated with instances like the use of two different styles of 4 to complete the dates for the 1874H 5 cents. On the other hand overdates and certain other varieties in legends and dates were associated with a calculated act on the part of the engravers. If one is interested in assigning importance (as far as the Mint was concerned) to these varieties, they must be considered as individual cases.
The Repunching Variants of the 1858 Large Date Five Cents
In 1951 Peter Favro first reported (33) that some of the five cents of 1858 had a large date, while most had a date with smaller figures. It has subsequently come to be widely accepted that the large date pieces, although quite scarce, could be subdivided into two date variants, one having the final 8 “re-engraved” and the other not (34). That notion was challenged by Hans Zoell in the second edition of his catalogue of varieties and mint errors published in 1962 (35). He claimed, in addition to the above-mentioned variants, the existence of large date coins with the 85 and 858 repunched and the entire large date punched over the classical small date.+++ Two years later in New Netherlands' celebrated 58th Sale catalogue John Ford, Jr. included two presumably double-punched date pieces where the 858 was involved (36). More recently (37) Ford has noted a specimen with the 85 repunched. The writers of the standard catalogues and trends have not yet responded to the findings of either Zoell or Ford.
The writer began to seriously study the large date coins about three years ago, and although lack of specimens has been a plaguing problem, enough information is at hand to make its presentation worthwhile. Before taking up the variants in detail, some general comments are in order.
It sometimes becomes advantageous for one to be able to tell with certainty whether two coins are from the same or different dies. Remember that because working punches contained the entire date the question cannot be immediately answered by the dates having identical fine detail. A simple and reliable die differentiation method is comparison of die crack patterns. No two dies crack in exactly the same way; if two coins are both from cracked dies the desired decision can be quickly reached for the side in question. This method is particularly applicable to the Provincial coinage, because at that time the die steel was generally poor, making cracked dies commonplace.
Another coin comparison technique of which we have made extensive use is “photographic overlaying”. It is employed primarily for comparing the positioning of figures and letters. The coins to be compared are photographed, preferably at the same magnification. An enlarged “contrasty” print (20X or so compared to the coin) is made from one of the negatives. The print is then placed on the base of a photographic enlarger and the negatives of the other coins projected, one by one, on the print. When the magnification of the enlarger is adjusted so that the image on the print is the same magnification as that being projected (by making constant features such as primary design elements exactly overlap), the positioning of figures and letters can be accurately compared. An example of the application of this technique to answer a specific research question will be seen in a later section.
THE BUSINESS STRIKES OF THE PLAIN (NOT REPUNCHED)
LARGE DATE COINS
There is little question that the plain large date business strikes are many times scarcer than their repunched counterparts. This is at variance with the standard catalogues, which by their pricing suggest the opposite. Leslie Hill has examined over fifty large date specimens and not found a single plain date (37, 8). Our experience has been similar to Hill's. Zoell, however, illustrates (4) a high grade piece he feels is a plain date. It would seem that some were actually struck but in very small number.
TABULATION OF THE REPUNCHED LARGE DATE BUSINESS STRIKES
As already noted there has been disagreement among the various writers as to the number of digits repunched. The opinions vary from one to four. Of course, they could all be correct if more than one variant were being described. And, in fact, Zoell and Ford have made it clear that there are multiple variants. Nevertheless, we shall show in a later section that it is very likely (regardless of the variant) that when repunching of the kind we are talking about occurred all four digits were involved. The failure of other writers to detect doubling in at least the 858 probably results from diagnosing worn specimens or ones from dies sunk from damaged punches.
It is not uncommon on the Provincial issues to see specimens having little or no wear yet having one or more letters or figures quite weak (in low relief). Many such instances are probably due to damage or wear to that part of working punches. Theoretically all weak characters in dies should have been repunched; however, in the case of the Provincials many dies were used in a fairly short period of time, so the engravers may have been rather lax. In any event the reader should carefully examine the first 8 of the illustration for Variant 3 in Fig. 15. The repunching is really clear only in the lower loop. It is easy to imagine how a “re-engraved 58” would evolve following even moderate circulation.
Trying to discern repunching detail on well worn specimens is always a dangerous pastime and is even worse when one is dealing with dates as small as those on the five cents. Pieces in less than very fine condition should be approached with considerable caution.
All the repunched date specimens we have examined to date fall into four categories:
Variant 1 -clear signs of doubling of all four digits, the repunching being to the right (as seen on the coins) of the originals. The 1 is noticeably higher than the 858 and to the left of the second 8 can be seen part of the upper loop of the original figure (arrow 28, Plate 15). Examples are Lot 259 of New Netherlands' 58th Sale and Lot 44 of Kay Coin Service Corporation's May 7, 1966 Sale.
Variant 2 -even date with repunching of the 858 recognizable (to the left of the original figures). See lots 258 and 244 in New Netherlands' 58th and 59th Sales, respectively; also Zoell's XR IOIr (4).
Variant 3 -as Var. 2, except the 5 is made up of three separate impressions instead of two.
Variant 4 (photo not available) - even date with doubling of the 858. The later figures are to the upper right, the right and the left of the originals. Probably corresponds to Zoell's XR IOIu (4). The only specimen we have examined was stmck from a badly collapsed die; there was a pronounced bulge along much of the left branch of maple on the reverse.
THE PROOFS
Both grained and plain edge large date proofs are known, the latter kind being scarcer. Two low magnifaction photos of grained edge specimens have been seen by us. Both show repunching of the kind illustrated in Plate 15, except the 8's are well centered over the original ones. Another die was employed for the plain edge pieces. In that case the date is lightly double-punched, not at all the kind of repunching as in our illustrations.
THE SITE OF REPUNCHING
Now the repunching of the dates could have occurred in matrices, dies or both. Variants 2 and 3 provide the answer, at least for the business strikes. Except for some deteriorative distortion the fine detail and positions (by photographic overlaying) of the 18-8 of these variants are the same. The two impressions of the 5 of Var. 2 correspond to two of those of the Var. 3 figure. Recognizing the virtual impossibility that such identity could result from separate repunchings, .only one alternative is available. Either Var.'s 2 and 3 are from the same reverse die or they are from separate dies reproduced from the same matrix. Foregoing some indirect arguments that lead to the same conclusion, we can immediately state that they are from different dies; both coins were struck from badly cracked reverse dies, and the crack patterns are entirely different. In other words the repunching of the 18-8 and the first repunching of the 5 took place in a matrix. The additional 5 impression on Var. 3 was probably introduced at the die stage (see below).
THE NATURE OF THE FIGURES REPUNCHED
Ideally one would like to know something about the kind of figures residing beneath the large date ones. Some suggestions have already been made by others. Ford feels that the digits are double-punched (that is, the original digits are also of the large date kind) and submits that the repunching was done to correct poor positioning of the original figures. Concerning Lot 244 (59th Sale), he remarks, “Even 1, 858 first cut too far r., then corrected .. .”. Zoell provides another explanation for one of the business strike variants and the grained edge proofs. He feels that the large date is punched over the classical small date.
Some time ago we recognized that the 8's of these coins appeared to be punched over smaller figures, but rejected the idea of their being completely identical to the classical small date ones, because the upright of the original 5 on Var.'s 2 and 3 is rather thinner than that of any small date 5's we had ever encountered. More recently we have applied photographic overlaying to the problem, with most enlightening results. In all cases the small date shown in Plate 15 fit nicely over those parts of the original figures visible in the large date repunching variants. On those variants where the large 1 was the only figure that could be seen the small date 1 fit completely underneath it. It is evident that the classical small date (CSD), that seen on the small date coins, bears a very close relationship to the one that was overpunched with the large date (hereafter called the original small date (OSD)). It is certain that the CSD is somehow derived from the OSD.
The identity of position of the figures is too close for them to have been punched in on separate occasions. One possibility is that the 5 of the CSD was punched over the OSD figure in a master matrix. Our findings are summarized in the hypothetical scheme below:
... graphic missing from page 152
The additional 5 impression of Var. 3 remains to be rationalized. The die that struck the specimen shown for Var. 2 was sunk from a relatively intact B* working punch. That for Var. 3 was rather weak in part of the date and legend. Note the smearing of the repunching detail in the upper loop of the first 8. Perhaps in order to strengthen a partly weakened 5, a third impression (using a large date 5) was punched by hand into the newly sunk annealed die. The front and back tips of the third 5 are indicated by the arrowheads. The die was then dressed, polished and hardened. If that notion is correct, Var. 3 would have to be the product of a single die. The tale we have spun may seem a little wild; however, it should perhaps be mentioned that our data have been discussed with an experienced diesinker, and he agrees with our conclusions.
It will be noted that Fig. 5 suggests a surprisingly high number of dies were used to strike such a scarce issue. And, because of the small number of specimens examined, more variants may well exist. The only thing we might mention is that it is well known that the die steel tended to be very poor in those days, and in that event the average number of pieces struck per reverse die could be very low. That the steel for the particular dies concerning us was bad is indicated by the high incidence of cracking and collapsing (32).
We are frankly unable to provide the reader with much concrete information regarding why these overpunchings occurred. They were surely deliberate and were presumably some kind of experiment. The question of whether the classical small date coins or the large date/original small date coins were struck first is also one that defies a quick answer. Both the CSD and the LD/OSD are derived from the OSD. Therefore, the CSD did not necessarily have to arise prior to the LD/OSD.
It should also be noted that there are variants of the classical small date. The date element shown in Plate 15 has a slender 1. Other specimens seen have a wider figure. In all cases, however, all four digits are in the same position, suggesting that the CSD with the wide 1 arose by overpunching in a narrow 1 CSD matrix.
Finally, Zoell has reported (4) what he calls a tall date. It is taller than the CSD but narrower than the LD figures. The styles of the TD figures is similar to the CSD ones. The whereabouts of the only known specimen, an extensively circulated one, is currently a mystery.
PLATE 15
Classical Small Date
... graphic missing from page 153
We acknowledge with thanks the help and encouragement of Hans Zoell, Cec Tannahill, Leslie Hill and Thomas Shingles.
REFERENCES AND FOOTNOTES
29. In the present series of papers references, figures, tables and plates are numbered consecutively beginning with the first paper.
30. Haxby, J. A., CNJ, 13, 313 (1968).
31. Haxby, J. A., CNJ, 13,422 (1968).
32. Haxby, J. A., Matrices, Punches and Dies. To be published.
33. Favro, Peter, CN.A.B., 2(2), 4 (1951).
34. Charlton, J.E., Standard Catalogue of Canadian Coins, Tokens and Paper Money, 17th Ed., Whitman Publishing Co., Racine, Wis., 1969.
35. Zoell, Hans, Canadian Coin Variety Catalogue, 2nd Ed., Hobby Publishing Co., Regina, 1962.
36. Lots 258 and 259, New Netherlands Coin Co. 58th Sale Catalogne, Sept., 1964.
37. Lot 245, New Netherlands Coin Co. 59th Sale Catalogue, June, 1967.
38. Hill, Leslie, CN.J., 9, 237 (1964). First published in 1962 in the Vancouver Numismatic Society's “News Bulletin”.
39. Hill, Leslie, Personal Communication.
40. The H mint mark also often varies in position (for the same reason as the final digits of the date).
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Canadian Stamp Antique News April 1970 p. 6
Club News: Big Show By Central And CNCVA [sic: CNVCA]
The Canadian Numismatic Variety Collectors' Association Convention, hosted by the Central Coin Club, will be held at Toronto's Westbury Hotel  April 11 and 12. The convention will be held in conjunction with Central's annual spring show, the highlights of which will be bourse, dealers, displays, prizes, trophies, certificates, demonstrations and new wooden nickels. This will be Central's tenth show at the Westbury. During the show four other clubs will hold regular meetings. They, are Richmond Hill, Thistletown, Oshawa and Oakville. Each club will have a guest speaker provides by the CNCVA. Those wishing information about the show which, according to officials, promises to be the best event of the spring numismatic season, should contact The Secretary, Central Coin Club, Carriage House Hotel, 300 Jarvis Street, Toronto, Ont. Information about the variety collectors can be had by writing CNCVA Head Office, P.O. Box 91, Station H, Toronto, Ont.
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The Kayak Vol. 1 No. 1 January 1971 p. 5
Wrong View on Canadian Coins By Hans Zoell
Reading an article in Numismatic News, December l, 1970 with the heading “PRICING CANADIAN COINS”, I am at a loss to understand what the writer is trying to accomplish. Either he is not too well informed or he may wish to belittle the active market on Canadian coins.
Will quote a few excerpts from this article. “The fact is that the interest in Canadian coin collecting has been withering at the vine since the booming interest in the field busted in 1965 with prices ballooned to very high, artificially based levels. The influential voices in the Canadian field mistakenly proceeded on the assumption that the interest would return, and the ill conceived premise that a status quo should be maintained in pricing”.
It is true, never the less, that the numismatic market took a dive in 1965, in both, Canada and the U.S.A., simply because some of the “fast buck” dealers had not given much thought and consideration to the collector - the consumer. These dealers drove prices up to the point where the collector simply would not buy, and, as a result, the roof came down. This sudden collapse brought down prices considerably, and gradually the market stabilized to the point where the established, ethical dealer is satisfied with his business, making a good living. This market collapse, in 1965 is, in one way, a lucky strike for the honest and established dealer, it got rid of most of the greedy “fast buck” dealers. This, then, enabled. the market to steady itself.
The Canadian numismatic market is far from “withering at the vine”. All one has to do is look at the consecutive one- and two-page advertisements in CSA News. These dealers would not be silly enough to pay for such costly ads if business was not good. In one case a dealer sends out nearly 5000 eight-page advertising, monthly. This, I am sure, he would not do if returns were not good enough to cover such high expense and at the same time make a good living for himself and his family.
I quote further from this article. “By early this year there was ample evidence that Canadian collecting was all but dead in many respects”. I wonder what “respects” he is referring to? It may be wishful thinking on the part of some Americans, but facts are facts, the Canadian numismatic market IS in a healthy state and is expected to continue to be healthy and steady.
While on the subject, I may as well mention the fact that some greedy U.S. dealers grabbed bushels of proof-like sets, thereby cutting off the regular supply to the collector, creating a monopoly, and cash in. However, this was not to be. Our then Finance Minister, Mr. Gordon, had the good sense to continue the production of these sets so that the deserving collector would be spared the excessive charges for such sets.
This happening discouraged many U.S. dealers. Since then they are not too eager to handle Canadian coins, reason for the U.S. market on Canadian coins being more or less dead - no ones fault but their own.
To establish the true facts, I invite the writer of the afore mentioned article, to come here and prove to himself that he cannot judge accurately from the other side of the border.
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The Kayak Vol. 1 No. 3 March 1971 pp. 42– 43 [reprinted below with modifications in The CN Journal : Vol. 19, no. 11 (Dec. 1974). – p. 384 - 385]
Re-entry, Re-cut, Die-shift, Deterioration by Hans Zoell
Terms, as appear in this heading, all seem to be related, at least in their formation, especially to the novice collector, in fact, to many advanced collectors as well. In general, these terms, four of them are all thrown into one basket and simply referred to as “re-engravings” by the overage collector, even by people that should know better.
It is far from the truth that these four different terms have the same meaning. There is a great and distinct difference in their creation and formation. “Engraving”, as well as “re-engraving” is an old art, skillfully executed by an experienced and learned artist, referred to as an “engraver”. With special cutting tools he is able to engrave figures, letters, ornamentation etc. This art, in this modern age is rarely found, and, to say the least, seldom needed. Here I am not referring to the engraver of jewelry, but the actual engraving of fine designs on steel dies from which the coins are struck. Today, with the greatly advanced mechanical equipment, there is no longer a need for painstaking, skilful and careful, time consuming hand or manual engraving. It is now a simple matter to make a die.
First, a plaster-cast, in enlarged form is made from an accepted design. From this plastercast the master intaglio (in reverse) is then mechanically prepared and, at the same time reduced to proper size. From this master intaglio, two working punches or “hubs” are prepared. These must be as perfect as humanly possible, for they are the masters from which all working dies are made. To prepare working dies, the master die (in relief) is hardened and then placed in a powerful press, where a piece of mild steel is forced against it to produce a working die. Small coins, such as the cent and ten cents usually require not more than two entries before a perfect impression (incused) is secured, while for larger coins, four to five entries are required to create a perfect intaglio on the working die. This intaglio is usually carefully examined to make sure that it is perfect in every respect. Any minor defects are corrected by hand, which is termed “re-cut” or “re-cutting”, a “major” variety.
A “re-entry” occurs when an entry has been made and the blank or hub move slightly out of alignment, either in rotation or direction. Some portions will show clear, sharp outlines to one side, especially on letters and figures. The strength of outlines depends on the degree of mis-alignment or shift. A “re-entry” also belongs to the “major” variety class.
A “die-shift” happens when the working die is chattering, meaning that the die is no longer firm and securely held, in other words - the die is beginning to come loose. Coins struck with a chattering die (usually the obverse die) also reveal outlines similar to re-entries in appearance, but are totally different. Close examination will show this outlining heavier on one side of the coin and that the letters, etc. are pushed to one side, causing narrowing the face of the effected characters. Other distinct identification marks are that this pushing over not only narrows the characters, but also pushes this metal up on the edge of each character.
Die deterioration is another form of doubling, again, similar in appearance to a re-entry, to the naked and inexperienced eye. There is a great difference however, in that this doubling is not sharp and the outlining is sometimes visible on both sides of a character, although, always strongest on the side toward the outside rim of the coin. In most instances, deterioration is noticed first on the very edge of the die, near and between the beading or teething, but seldom all around the full circle. This breaking up of the working die becomes worse as time goes on during striking and will finally move inward to the edges of the recessed portions. A good example is the so-called double date 5¢ of the 1962 issue, where deterioration is easily noticeable on entire lower portion of the design, including the beaver and the water lines.
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The Kayak Vol. 1 No. 6-7 (June-July 1971) p. 94
Double-sided UNIFACE COINS by Hans Zoell
I have examined a goodly number of fictitiously manufactured coins with either two obverse or two reverse designs. Most of them are created outside the Mint but I have also had the opportunity to examine several specimens that must have been created inside the Mint because actual dies were used to strike the one double sided uniface coin.
Specimens created outside the Mint usually consist of two turned down thin (on a lathe) portions of two coins. These thin (slightly less then 1/2 thickness, allowing for the extra metal of solder) portions are then coated with a thin layer of solder and fitted together, applying heat to the point where they will fuse together. This is not too difficult to detect. By examining the outer rim closely, you may find partial white metal lines of split hairline size.
However, there are other methods of manufacture which are more difficult to detect. The coin is cut out to a certain depth on a small precision lathe, leaving the inner rim, including the teething or beading, intact. Another coin is turned down so that it will fit perfectly into the hollowed-out coin. Here again, both pieces are soldered together. In some cases, especially very small coins (59 silver), the inner rim edges are covered with some kind of substance and then baked so that it appears “patina-like” to hide the joining circle. It is not always proof-positive when you drop a coin on a hard surface and the coin has no ring to it, but in the above mentioned cases, it is quite reliable. It is advisable to drop a normal coin to reveal the difference in sound; however, if by chance this normal coin is laminated (partially split or contains impurities) a dull sound may be the result also--so be sure to use a healthy coin of the same denomination.
In the case of such double sided uniface coins, created in the Mint, no difference in sound can be detected simply because these are “single planchet” coins, no lathe work or fusing involved. To create such a piece, a soft planchet is placed into the collar. An already struck coin is placed on top of the soft planchet and then the two pieces are struck by the dies. Since the already struck coin is harder than the blank, the original design (reverse) will sink into the soft blank unaltered in shape and form. Due to excess pressure (because of the two pieces in the striking chamber), the original obverse design of the top piece vanished completely. The top piece would now be the double sided uniface coin. (So far, I have not seen a Mint creation with two obverses.) The soft blank will show a beautifully incused reverse strike, while the other side shows the normal obverse design. Such misstrikes are usually called “brockages”. In this case, however, it is not a normal brockage strike. A normal brockage strike has either the obverse or the reverse design on both sides, except that on one side the design is normal while on the other side, the design is incused.
Many uninformed collectors are of the opinion that it would be simple to strike such a coin by placing either two obverse or two reverse dies in a press. This is not possible since the adaptor shank on the obverse die is entirely different in form from that of the reverse die and would, therefore, not fit into the sockets or adaptors and vice versa.
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The Kayak Vol 1 No 11 November 1971 pp. 141, 146
FROM THE PRESIDENT
Hans Zoell, due to other commitments, has asked to be relieved from his duties as Editor of The KAYAK. He will continue to publish our monthly magazine and for this we are thankful.
John and Joanne Regitko, who have been assisting Hans, have accepted the job of editing the publication.
In order to issue information on as wide an area as possible, I am sure they would appreciate articles on the specialties of our members. Many members must have unpublished irregularities that would be of interest to other collectors. Now is the chance to get recognition, so write an article today and send it along to John and Joanne, at the address above.
Both John and Joanne have been on the founding committee since its inception. John has been involved in the irregularity field for a number of years and after a short recess from club participation, it is a pleasure to see him back.
A vote of thanks is in order to both Joanne and John for accepting this very important position.
Bill English, President, CIAC.
WHO'S WHO IN CIAC by Joanne Regitko
For our first distinguished member in this new, continuing series, we thought it would be appropriate to feature the man who has the distinction of being known as “the father of Canadian irregularity collecting” ... the man who holds Charter Membership #1 in CIAC ... Mr. Hans Zoell.
Hans was born on May 20, 1906 on a farm in Rhineland, Germany, the second oldest of eleven children. During his early years, Hans had to work very hard with the farm to help his family. His father wanted him ... to be a farmer; however, at the age of 17, Hans left the farm for Duesseldorf, where he went into apprenticeship and studied electrical engineering at school in the evenings.
In 1928 Hans immigrated to Canada and, until 1932 he worked as an electrical engineer. In 1932, because of hard times all around, Hans started to take on odd jobs such as carpentry work and electrical repairs. Most of his spare time was devoted to picking up stamps from various places and by 1935, he had accumulated quite a stock of them--enough to establish himself in the stamp business. One year later, Hans added his collection of foreign coins to his extensive store stock.
In 1938 Hans married and settled down to raise a family of four; three boys, Bob, Don and Paul; and one girl, Jeannette. Hans' family is now well spread out with Don living in Edmonton, Paul in Regina, Bob in Los Angeles and Jeannette in Calgary. And, Hans' family has now expanded ... 10 grand children.
Hans first got into the printing trade after the second world war when he had the opportunity to buy into a small printing business. In 1954, in partnership with Lisa Kadannek, he opened up a new hobby shop called “Phila-Coin Go.” All the hard work took its toll on Hans' health. He was taken ill with a stroke and three months later he had a mild heart attack. Because of this strain on his health, Hans and Lisa sold the business in 1963 and Hans left Canada for a visit back to Germany to be with his family.
In November 1965, in his first issue of Unusual Canadian Coins, Hans correctly predicted “A great future lies ahead in this type of collecting as it is educational and interesting ... let's face it, varieties are here to stay.” In September 1966, the publication's name was changed to Unusual Numismatic Objects and until October 1968, through the pages of U.N.O., Hans continued to bring his readers educational articles' photographs and timely news items. However, due to his deteriorated health, Hans was forced to give up publishing his magazine and irregularity collectors all across Canada and the U.S. shared the grief of the publication's demise.
Early in 1969, Hans moved to Toronto and set up business under the name of Hobby Publications at 92 Jarvis Street, Toronto, where he now prints our monthly magazine, The KAYAK. As you know, Hans is its Publisher and we are indeed fortunate to be able to reap the benefits from his wealth of knowledge and experience in both the printing trade and the hobby of irregularity collecting.
For many years, Hans has been known as the authority on the irregularity hobby. He is the author of numerous irregularity catalogues and as a matter of fact, there is only one Canadian irregularity reference work that has not been authored by him. In addition, Hans has published and authored grading books.
Hans holds the distinction of being the first Canadian member of the Retail Coin Dealers' Association (RCDA). He holds life membership *30 in the CNA and is a member in the ONA and NECA. He is a past director of CONE, a position he held for close to seven years and is the past Honorary President of CNVCA.
Many of you are already anxiously awaiting the publication of his big, new irregularity book on which he has been working for some time. We asked Hans when he expects to have it out and he said that it would be “next year for sure.”
Hans is an accomplished photographer and printer. As an irregularity collector, Hans is an exacting and knowledgeable man ... as a man, he is a generous, warm hearted and loyal friend. Hans is truly an UNFORGETTABLE CHARACTER.
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The CN Journal Vol. 18N03March1973.pdf  pages 75 - 76
Letters to the Editor
I have, of late, observed considerable improvements in the layout, various headings and pleasing appearance of the entire Journal in general. I specially admired the much improved front cover set-up. It is pleasing to look at.
However, solids and half-tones leave desire of improvement. Their appearance is not the quality to match the rest of the magazine. I sincerely hope that some improvement will be made in this aspect in the not too distant future. If this would be the case, then we, the members would have the best magazine in its field.
Most sincerely, Hans Zoell, LM-30
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The CN Journal Vol. 19N04April1974.pdf    page 114
THE CHALLENGE OF RESEARCH IN CANADIAN NUMISMATICS
By ROBERT W. RIGHTMIRE, C.N.A. 11465
While in an historical sense the numismatic history of Canada must seem short when compared to that of many areas in Asia and Europe it still can offer the researcher a challenge that is considerable in both depth and breath. The coinage pattern of Canada mirrors the development of our continent. From examining rare fifteen sols coinage of 1670 to the present day Olympic Coin Program one can have unfold before him an outline of Canadian history that has yet to be told in detail.
Outstanding contributions have been made by numismatic scholars like Fred Bowman and R. C. Willey; practical work has been done by serious numismatists like J.E. Charlton, J. A. Haxby, Frank Rose, and Hans Zoell. Yet their contributions merely point out the direction that others might head. One need only examine Fred Bowman's outstanding index of Canadian numismatic research to realize that in-depth investigations into a wide range of pertinent topics have yet to be initiated. Many articles fall into the category of popular reading which ultimately yield little in terms of numismatic knowledge.
As a numismatist in general and a member of our association in particular you might agree with this argument and yet still feel justified in asking “Well what can I do”? It is easy to further rationalize by expressing the view that only a select few have the necessary attributes to conduct meaningful research. Yet “reports to the membership”, this term might be less frightening than the word research” on even a very limited topic serve all numismatists. Anyone who read Robert G. Ballagh's comments on the 1973 fifty cent piece with the missing motto and the responses it generated must have appreciated the service to all of us that this exchange produced.
This year could mark a renaissance in numismatic literature if we all accept this challenge. Our steps need not be sophisticated. On the most basic level we could all examine our new acquisitions more carefully.
Might each new coin, token, or bill pose questions that only careful study will answer. The next step is to “buy the book before the coin.” I wish this motto were mine because it strikes as the essence of what numismatics really should be. Credit for this saying belongs to a true numismatist, Aaron Feldman. Buying the book might not be the complete answer because we have, as close as our mail boxes, the C.N.A. library. Surely our librarian, Hazel Munro, would love to inform the membership that additional help is needed because of a drastic increase in the borrowing of materials. Finally we must be willing to communicate with one another about our findings. Undoubtedly our editor, Frank Rose, would welcome the opportunity to state that his editorial files were filled instead of “empty”.
The ultimate worth of the C.N.A. rests not with the dedication of those few who continually serve us but with the desire of all of us to help light the lamp of numismatic knowledge.
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The CN Journal Vol. 19, No. 11 (December 1974) p. 384–385 [different from the first printing in The Kayak Vol. 1 No. 3 March 1971 pp. 42– 43]
Re-entry, re-cut, re-shift, deterioration By Hans Zoell
Terms, as appear in this heading, all seem to be related, at least in their formation, especially to the novice collector, in fact, to many advanced collectors as well. In general, these terms, four of them are all thrown into one basket and simply referred to as “re-engravings” by the average collector, even by people that should know better.
It is far from the truth that these four different terms have the same meaning. There is a great and distinct difference in their creation and formation. “Engraving”, as well as “re-engraving” is an old art, skilfully executed by an experienced and learned artist, referred to as an “engraver”. With special cutting tools he is able to engrave figures, letters, ornamentation, etc. This art, in this modern age is rarely found, and, to say the least, seldom needed. Here I am not referring to the engraver of jewelry, but the actual engraving of fine designs on steel dies from which the coins are struck. Today, with the greatly advanced mechanical equipment, there is no longer a need for painstaking, skilful and careful, time consuming hand or manual engraving. It is now a simple matter to make a die.
First, a plaster-cast, in enlarged form is made from an accepted design. From this plaster cast the master intaglio (in reverse) is then mechanically prepared and, at the same time reduced to proper size. From this master intaglio, two working punches or “hubs” are prepared. These must be as perfect as humanly possible, for they are the masters from which all working dies are made. To prepare working dies, the master die (in relief) is hardened and then placed in a powerful press, where a piece of mild steel is forced against it to produce a working die. Small coins, such as the cent and ten cents usually required not more than two entries before a perfect impression (incused) is secured, while for larger coins, four to five entries are required to create a perfect intaglio on the working die. This intaglio is usually carefully examined to make sure that it is perfect in every respect. Any minor defects are corrected by hand, which is termed “re-cut” or “re-cutting”.
A “re-entry” occurs when an entry has been made and the blank or hub move slightly out of alignment, either in rotation or direction. Some portions will show clear, sharp outlines to one side, especially on letters and figures. The strength of outlines depends on the degree of mis-alignment or shift.
A “die-shift” happens when the working die is chattering, meaning that the die is no longer firm and securely held, in other words - the die is beginning to come loose. Coins struck with a chattering die (usually the obverse die) also reveal outlines similar to re-entries in appearance, but are totally different. Close examination will show this outlining heavier on one side of the coin and that the letters, etc. are pushed to one side, causing narrowing the face of the effected characters. Other distinct identification marks are that this pushing over not only narrows the characters, but also pushes this metal up on the edge of each character. If you find that the beading or teething (inside of the outer rim of the coin) is also double, then you can be sure that it is a “die-shift”.
Die deterioration is another form of doubling, again, similar in appearance to a re-entry, to the naked and inexperienced eye. There is a great difference however, in that this doubling is not sharp and the outlining is sometimes visible on both sides of a character, although, always strongest on the side toward the outside rim of the coin. In most instances, deterioration is noticed first on the very edge of the die, near and between the beading or teething, but seldom all around the full circle. This breaking up of the working die becomes worse as time goes on during striking and will finally move inward to the edges of the recessed portions. A good example is the so-called double date Se of the 1962 issue, where deterioration is easily noticeable on entire lower portion of the design, including the beaver and the water lines.
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The CN Journal Vol. 20N05May1975.pdf
CNA Nominations     For The Office Of ONTARIO DIRECTOR
Robert Aaron, F.R.M.S., C.N.A. 8153, 372 Bay St., Toronto, Ont. The Toronto Star Numismatic Columnist is a member of the A.N.A., A.N~S., C.P.M.S., The Numismatic Literary Guild, Toronto Coin Club, Central Coin Club & North York Coin Club. Occupation - Lawyer.
Nominated By:           Huronia Num. Assoc., C.N.A. 5063; North York Coin Club, C.N.A. 11577; W.H. McDonald, C.N.A. 5415; D.A. Thomas, C.N.A. LM 116; Bill English, C.N.A. LM 91; Hans Zoell, C.N.A. LM 30
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On Coin Photography Larry Gingras The CN Journal Vol. 22N04April1977.pdf
ON COIN PHOTOGRAPHY by Larry Gingras, F.R.N.S.
A short while ago. in a letter from Ross Irwin. coin photography was mentioned. Ross suggested it would be a good idea if some of the Fellows with experience in this line would write an article on the subject for the Transactions. I volunteered to start the ball rolling but, please bear in mind that while not an authority on all aspects of coin photography, I have done much experimenting with this part of numismatics and have had a fair amount of success in producing legible photographs.
The reason for writing this is not to tell anyone what they MUST do or what they must NOT do. The reason is that possibly some of you who have been engaged in this type of photography, or are contemplating it, may find some suggestions or clues that will be of help to you.
last paragraph of article:
You may be interested to know that Hans Zoell also uses the circular light technique but produces a print in a quite different manner. Through means of a prism he projects the image directly onto enlarging paper, and thus does away with making a negative.
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The CN Journal Vol. 22N06June1977.pdf
Jiggery-Pokery
In the Merry Month of May, as the reader will surely recall, this column presented some trifling details of the activities of fakers with respect to Canadian twenty-five cent pieces and higher denominations in nickel, silver, and gold. The story is continued this month with the smaller coins, beginning with a question. How soon will someone attempt to fake the 1969 ten-cent piece with the old reverse? As is well known, it was in 1969 that the reverse die was completely re-engraved, and shows a smaller ship and smaller lettering. One, and only one, specimen dated 1969 with the original reverse showing the larger ship was found in circulation in Toronto and shown to Hans Zoell, who photographed it. No other specimen has ever been found. Since the original is unobtainable for the purposes of spark erosion or the production of moulds for casting, this rarity can only be faked by altering the dates of 1968 coins to 1969.
Enough said.
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The CN Journal Vol. 23N03March1978.pdf
THE 1969 LARGE DATE-LARGE SCHOONER DIME By J. C. Levesque
Probably the most interesting of all Canadian coins to come along in years is the 1969 large date-large schooner ten-cent piece. Though this variety is eagerly sought by nearly everyone involved in Canadian numismatics, no specimens have yet been advertised for sale, nor has any appeared in auction sales.
This transitional variety resulted when a decision was made by mint officials to discontinue the old style reverse and substitute a more aesthetically pleasing design. However, before this change was made, an unknown number of dies was sunk and used to strike a quantity of 1969 dimes of the old style (large schooner). Some of these, or perhaps all, were issued for circulation but the exact number is unknown and evidently very small. At some time in 1969 the old reverse type was withdrawn and coinage began of the new reverse with a smaller schooner. The 1969 Report of the Royal Canadian Mint mades no mention of the transition from the old style reverse to the new.
Only one specimen of the old reverse is known thus far. It was discovered by a lynx-eyed woman who found it in change in Toronto. She brought it to Hans Zoell, the well-known numismatic writer and authority on mint errors, to be photographed. The coin was later proved to be identical to the original matrix at the mint. So far the coin is unique, but the possibility cannot be ignored that there may be other specimens in circulation.
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The CN Journal Vol. 25N05May1980.pdf
THE SHELDON QUANTITATIVE GRADING SYSTEM by J. C. Levesque
The primary purpose of any grading system is to communicate a mental image of a coin's state of preservation and its physical appearance. It is generally accepted that no two coins are exactly alike and the same also applies to the degree of wear on them. For example, when two coins in Fine condition are compared, one will probably be better preserved than the other. As a result, it will be more desirable and its value will be greater than the coin with more wear. The problem is how to describe this difference without using so many words. One way to achieve this would be to assign a predefined number to the basic grade.
Various unsuccessful attempts to introduce numerical grading systems have been made in the past. Among the most notable efforts were those of Seavey (1873), Reschke (1937), Zoell (1965), Long (1973), Krueger (1975), etc. However, no quantitative grading system had been widely accepted by the numismatic fraternity until Dr. William Herbert Sheldon introduced (in 1949) his own system in his reference entitled “Early American Cents”, which was subsequently revised and republished as “Penny Whimsy” in 1958.
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The Leader-Post, Regina, Saskatchewan. Friday, December 24, 1982
ZOELL-December 23. 1982.
Hans Zoell. late of 753 Montague Sf., Regina. passed away at the age of 76 years.
Predeceased by his parents; three brothers and one sister, Mr. Zoell Is survived by a good friend, Elizabeth Kadannek; three sons: Don of Edmonton, Bob of Los Angeles. Paul of Regina; one daughter, Jeanette of Calgary; 11 grandchildren; one brother and four Sisters. all In Germany. The funeral service will be held on Tuesday, December 28. 1982 al 2:00 p.m. In The Chapel of The Lee Funeral Home. 3101 Dewdney Ave. with Rev. J. Balzer. officiating. Interment In Riverside Memorial Park Cemetery. Visitation for family and friends will be held on Monday. December 27. 1982 between 7:00 and 7:30 p.m. In The Chapel of the Lee Funeral Home. John Lipp. Funeral Director.
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Canadian Coin News Vol. 20 No. 18 (January 3–11, 1983) p. 1
Dean of Canadian numismatics died in Regina
After an extended illness, the “dean” of Canadian numismatics, Hans Zoell, died in Regina on December 23. The collector's collector, Zoell shunned the numismatic spotlight, but dedicated his time to furthering the hobby in Canada, writing numerous books and manuscripts in the process.
Zoell, who operated a small print shop on the second floor office building of what is now Charlton's on Toronto's Queen street, was a publisher of two numismatic magazines, a photographer, a consultant to numerous auction houses in the preparation of their catalogs and was the undisputed leader in the study of Canadian varieties.
A life member of the Canadian Numismatic Association, Zoell became involved in numismatics in 1936 and, despite all his accomplishments and work he did to promote the hobby, he was never officially recognized for his great contributions.
Hans was born in May 1906 on a farm in the Rhineland, Germany, one of eleven children. His early years were spent learning the trade of the farmer, a vocation he readily admitted he was never suited for. At the age of 17, he entered an apprenticeship in electrical engineering in Düsseldorf. In 1928, he joined his aunt in Regina where he was employed in this field until 1932.
Hans established himself in the stamp and supply business during the depression, after accumulating stamps from local offices. In 1936, he expanded into the dealing of coins, but was faced with an almost non-existent demand for Canadian specimens.
With the dawn of the Second World War, Zoell purchased a printing press and the business of stamps became a sideline. It wasn't until 1953 that he re-established himself with the opening of Phila-Coin Co. The combination of printing and coins eventually led Hans into the publishing business, resulting in a torrent of numismatic books in the early 1960s.
Some of the publications included: The Premium Catalog, The Simplified Catalog of Canadian and Newfoundland Coins and Paper Money, The Simplified Grading Guide for Coins of Canada and Newfoundland, The Canadian Coin Variety Catalog, Major Coin Varieties, Minor Coin Varieties, and a magazine called Unusual Canadian Coins.
Hans was one of the founders of the Canadian Numismatic Variety Collectors Association and was active in its American counterparts. For some time, the C.N.V.C.A. was so successful, it was able to hold its own conventions.
He was also the publisher of The Kayak, the official publication of the Coin Irregularity Association of Canada. One needs little imagination to conjure up the hours, months and years spent slaving over the typewriter, the camera and printing press to almost single-handedly put together all of these publications.
Hans spent several years in the late 1960s and early 1970s in Toronto where he continued to operate his Hobby Publications business. Eventually, poor health and the lure of the prairies took Hans back to Regina.
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The CN Journal Vol. 28N02February1983.pdf                      pp. 55
President's Message
In previous Messages I remarked about benefits this hobby brings including the fine people one meets at coin club meetings, at conventions and in Dealer shops.
One of the people I met early in the hobby, when I collected error coinage exclusively, was Hans Zoell, the Dean of die variety and error collectors. Hans was at least ten years ahead of his time when he published a book on Die Varieties in 1960.
I spent many Saturdays at Hans' printing shop using his IBM Executive typewriter writing articles for the KAYAK, official publication of the Coin Irregularity Association of Canada (initials CIAC, pronounced kayak, hence the name of the bulletin. If I remember correctly, it was Hans who suggested both names).
A few times each Saturday, he used to stop what he was doing and reach for his trusted mickey of Schnapps that he always had on hand. His doctor told him that when a tight pain gripped his chest, he should take a swig. Schnapps kept him alive for many years!
He turned out many issues of Unusual Numismatic Objects and other publications, as well as seven different editions of his Minor or Major Die Varieties books. He never made any money on them whether due to lack of promotion or simply because he just didn't charge enough for the quality product he was turning out for us “error nuts”, as we were affectionately (?) called. This error nut used to sit with bags of coins and his 20X magnifying glass looking for die varieties listed in Zoell's.
Hans made many friends in his shop where he worked 6 1/2 days a week. One of them who visited him regularly and assisted us in our editorial chores, was Bill English, another variety collector (Bill went on to become President of the Coin Irregularity Association of Canada as well as the ONA).
Hans' photographic efforts were something to behold. He built a darkroom complete with the required running water tanks. He built room-long runners to have his camera travel back and forth to give him the magnification required. Best of all, he incorporated a photographic process that would give him a positive print on paper (rather than a negative) that enabled us to print bulletins the inexpensive “instant print” way that was to become so popular years later.
When he retired to Regina, he continued to correspond with us, even after another heart attack and losing a leg to gangrene.
Another renowned error enthusiast, Arnold Margolis of Oceanside, N.Y., and I reminisced about Hans when we met at the ANA Convention last summer, recalling many fond memories we had of Hans and Lisa, whose shoulder was always there for him to lean on. During our conversation, I promised Arnold a set of Hans' monthly publications, since I inherited a few spares when he closed shop at his basement location on lower Jarvis Street to move out West. I know that Arnold will appreciate them as the works of art that they were, and still are, even 20 years after their publication. Little did we suspect then that Hans would have just another five months on this earth. He passed away two days before Christmas.
Hans may have gone, but he left behind a collecting-field surpassed only in popularity in its day by “normal” decimal coins. Even today it would rank right up there with Wooden Nickels and Trade Dollars except that it is not as visible as these two relatively new fields. Error collecting no longer has the benefit of exposure through an active error association or bulletins that died with Hans' move back to Regina some years ago.
Bob Aaron expressed his concern just a few months ago that some of the pioneers of popular collecting fields are not being recognized for their contribution to numismatics. He mentioned Hans Zoell specifically. However, the wheels of recognition sometimes not only turn slowly, but stand still completely. Hans may have been overlooked in his lifetime as a pioneer, but to some of us collectors of pioneer-fields, he will be remembered for his generosity and kindheartedness – and the bottle of life-saving Schnapps that was his constant companion for so many years.
John Regitko
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The CN Journal Vol. 28N02February1983.pdf                      p. 57
HANS ZOELL C.N.A. LM 30
May 20th, 1906 -1982 December 23rd.
Hans was born on May 20th, 1906 in the Rhineland, Germany. Raised on a farm, he knew all about hard work and not wanting to be a farmer he went into the City of Duesseldorf at 17 years of age where he apprenticed as an electrician, taking night school as well to learn electrical engineering.
An aunt was instrumental in Hans leaving Germany and coming to Regina to live. Arriving in 1928 he was employed in his profession until 1932 when along with thousands of others he was without a job. Doing any job that came along - digging, cleaning or whatever - he started picking up stamps from the waste baskets in the numerous offices in which he did his odd jobs.
In 1935 he started in the Stamp & Supply business, making many of the items needed in his supply section. In 1936 he had an opportunity to acquire a large collection. of foreign coins and this started him in the numismatic field.
In 1940 he needed additional income so he purchased a small printing business, doing any kind of printing jobs. In 1953 he decided to go into the Stamp & Coin business full time, started the Phila-Coin Company and took in Elizabeth Kadannek as a partner.
Hans was one of the first Canadian dealers to publish a Premium Catalogue which showed the collector the prices that were being paid for the coins. About this time Hans was bitten by the Variety Bug and started photographing all varieties and being the perfectionist, he developed ways to better photograph the coins so that all features were clearly illustrated. This was shown in the many books that he published.
In 1960 he published his first edition of the Canadian Coin Variety Catalogue. This resulted in a demand for more photographs of the many varieties that the collector had accumulated so the second edition was published in 1962.
In November, 1965, he started the magazine “Unusual Canadian Coins”, a monthly publication; changing the name in September, 1966 to “Unusual Numismatic Objects”. Working 20 hours a day to get the magazine out and other Variety books resulted in a breakdown in his health so he had to close down the magazine and the last issue was Sept.-Oct. 1968.
His poor health meant a change so he sold all his catalogues and copyrights to Charlton Coin & Stamp Company, Toronto. He was asked to move to Toronto to help in the publishing of these books. While in Toronto he was instrumental in starting the “Coin Irregularity Association of Canada”. Their official publication “The Kayak” was edited by Hans.
Continued poor health forced Hans to quit work completely so he moved back to Regina where he hoped to do many of the things that he had put aside while working. His health did not improve and he passed away in Regina on December 23rd, 1982.
Hans married in 1938 and raised four children, Don, Bob, Jeanette and Paul. Elizabeth (Lisa) Kadannek remained his partner in his move to Toronto and back to Regina, looking after him the last few years.
Hans contributed greatly to Canadian Numismatics as his books on “Varieties of Canadian Coins” resulted in greater interest and study of the Canadian decimal coins. His magazines helped to bring many a collector into the numismatic field and a number of these became members of the Canadian Numismatic Association.
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The CN Journal Vol. 28N04April1983.pdf    pp. 156-
Some Aspects Of Canadian Decimal Coins by R.C. Willey
[excerpt page 161]
Another very mysterious coin is the 1969 ten-cent piece with the 'old' reverse. In 1969, a newly redrawn reverse was introduced - it showed a representation of the fishing schooner that was smaller than had been previously used, as well as smaller lettering and date. The existence of a 1969 dime with the old reverse (Figure 11) went unsuspected until, one day in Toronto, a woman showed a specimen to Hans Zoell, who photographed and documented it. It was seen by Dr. Haxby and included in “Coins of Canada” written by Haxby and Willey, and first published in 1971. This coin is still a mystery. Only two specimens have been discovered to my knowledge.
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The CN Journal Vol. 28N04April1983.pdf    pp. 182–3
During the 1960s, when so many people were looking for accidental flaws on coins, some were found on the commemorative five-cent piece, and were duly listed in the catalogues of minor varieties produced by the late Hans Zoell. There are some die cracks, notably one running along the I of GRATIA on the obverse and one through the ADA of CANADA on the reverse. Clash marks are also known. The outline in reverse of the king's throat and chin appears on some specimens as a curved line extending into the maple leaves from the exergue line. A diagonal line extending from the roof of the smelter through the dash between the dates is the outline in reverse of the back of the king's head. The well-known “half moon” flaws are reverse outlines of the ear lobe. Another variant shows slight doubling in the reverse inscriptions. This is best seen in the five and one of the date 1951.
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The CN Journal Vol. 29N07JulyAugust1984.pdf      331-4
Canada's Nickel Coinages by R.C. Willey
[excerpt page 333]
The odd interesting variation has been discovered over the years. The “No island” variants of 1968 are well known. Attempts were made to speculate in these when they were first noticed, but they are too numerous for this. The 1969 ten-cent piece with the old reverse of 1968 is, as said before, unique. It is unique in more ways than one, for, in the midst of a period when many strange varieties of purely irregular origin were turning up in the bourse or the auction room, this variety was brought in off the street by a woman in Toronto. She suddenly appeared with it on the premises of the late Hans Zoell, who realised what it was, photographed it, and gave it its first publicity. In spite of this, however, the coin remains unique.
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The CN Journal Vol. 29N09October1984.pdf           pp. 412-
The 1969 Large Date Ten Cents by Jeremy Day
[excerpt page 413]
Then, about one year after the man had been in my store, he returned to sell me the coin. He explained that he had sent the coin to Hans Zoell (now deceased), who photographed it and submitted the picture for the Charlton catalogue. Now the whole world would know that the 1969 large date ten cents really existed. The man also said he needed some money for personal reasons and would I pay $700.00 for the coin. This was more than Peter Degraaf's advertised buy of $550.00 for a BU coin, but I decided to take a risk on this VF coin and bought it. I now owned the plate coin in the 1978 and subsequent Charlton catalogues.
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The CN Journal Vol. 31N09October1986.pdf           pp. 412-
The Status of Numismatic Research and Writing in Canada Ross W. Irwin
Read at the Research & Writing Seminar, 1986 CNA Convention  
[excerpt page 412-3]
The period 1950 to 1966 was a transition in research and writing from the Twilight Zone to the new rediscovered Golden Age of Canadian Numismatics. In this period the Bulletin and Journal of the Canadian Numismatic Association were published. Research and publishing were almost exclusively on decimal coinage and inventory of what existed. A minor interest began in paper money about 1950 with C.S. Howard's listing of Canadian banknotes. Young fellows such as Leslie Hill, Larry Gingras and Bob Willey contributed regularly to The C.N. Journal. Regular columns in coin newspapers began in this period. With an increased interest in numismatics there was no place to publish; hence, Hans Zoell, Neil Carmichael, Starr Gilmore, and Fred Bowman published booklets on selected themes.
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The CN Journal Vol. 32N05May1987.pdf     pp. 197-200
Doubled Dies of the Reverse of the 1952 Ten Cents By Thomas E. Caton, LM 158
[excerpt page 197]
The next question is: Are these newly discovered doubled dies? Possibly yes, but I think that Hans Zoell may have known about them, because in his 1965 edition of MAJOR COIN VARIETIES he lists a “re-entered 19 in date” for 1952.3 This coin may be one of the doubled die varieties that is listed in Table 1. Other doubled dies exist, in my search for 1952 ten cent coins, I found reverse doubled dies on ten cents of 1951 (at least two varieties - shows in “10 CENTS”) (Figures 6 and 7). These varieties are alluded to in Hans Zoell's book, so other doubled dies may exist on other dates and denominations.
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The CN Journal Vol. 33N09October1988.pdf           p. 352
From the Editor
Back in June, at the request of the Royal Canadian Mint, a coin was seized from the Torex auction...
We have seen many odd things in Canadian numismatics these past twenty years or so...
The 1969 ten-cent piece with the large date, which is the old reverse die, is the one strange item that is unquestionably above suspicion. Of all the unusual variations from the normal in our coins, this alone was first found in casual circulation. The first specimen was discovered by a Toronto woman who brought it to the late Hans Zoell, who at that time was in Toronto. Wir muszen den Hans danken, for he had the wisdom to photograph it and record its discovery. Since then a second one has turned up. I can see that the Mint might order the confiscation of everything else enumerated above, but not this item, even though, strictly speaking, it has no legal status. It is doubtful that it could ever be proved that the issue of these 1969 dimes with the old reverse were not accidentally issued.
This recent seizure has all the prominent collectors and the dealers quite upset...
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The CN Journal Vol. 33N11December1988.pdf        p. 432
From the Editor
It is also good to hear of various individuals and organizations coming to the aid of the Association at this time when funds are running rather low. Costs are rising. Dues cannot be raised too much lest members be lost because they cannot meet the added expense themselves. The problem is being dealt with in interesting ways. Bob Shillingworth is making available brand new copies of the late Hans Zoell'sMinor Coin Varieties, 5th Edition” at an attractive price, the proceeds of all sales being donated to the Association.
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The CN Journal Vol. 35N04April1990.pdf    pp. 132-
Canadian Decimal Coins and Currencies by R.C. Willey
VI        The Ten Cent Piece
[excerpt page 139]
In 1968 coinage began, with the “Bluenose” reverse, in 500 fine silver. In the summer of 1968 the dime was first coined in pure nickel, and this metal has replaced silver for the subsidiary coinage. Pressure on the Royal Mint was enormous, and it was necessary to farm out some of the striking of dimes to the United States Mint in Philadelphia. Ottawa and Philadelphia issues in nickel can be distinguished by the type of reeding of the edge. The Ottawa reeding has V-shaped grooves, while the Philadelphia reeding has flat-bottomed grooves.
1968 .... The mintage in 500 fine silver was 70,500,000 pieces.
Ottawa mintage in nickel was 87,412,930 pieces. Philadelphia mintage in nickel was 85,170,000 pieces.
In 1969 a new reverse master die was sunk by Myron Cook, the mint engraver, to replace the original one, which was wearing out. The ship is smaller, nines and sixes in the dates being quite round compared to the older style. There is also a wider space between the rim and the bottom of the water on which the ship is sailing.
The dime of 1969 with the old style reverse is an excessively rare coin with a mysterious history. It is not known how a few were struck with old reverse. The circumstances surrounding the discovery of this rarity indicate that its existence is due solely to that time-honoured institution called for convenience an oversight. The first appeared in Ottawa in 1970, when a woman came in off the street to a dealer with a specimen in VF condition, found in change. She did not sell the coin, and left the shop. The dealer began to advertise offers to buy, but no other specimens were found till 1977, when a man walked into the shop of a Vancouver dealer with a second VF specimen, found in a roll of dimes bought in Hamilton, Ontario. This coin was later photographed by Hans Zoell. A third specimen, strictly Fine and badly meter-marked on both sides, appeared in 1979. It had been found in Buffalo, New York, and consigned at auction in Montreal. No others have been found since.
1969 .. .. The mintage for 1969 was 133,037,929 pieces, all but possibly three being with the new style reverse. So far, of the old reverse design, only three specimens are known.
1970 .... The mintage for 1970 was 10,302,101 pieces. There being a temporary oversupply of coins, the mintage of dimes was cut back.
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Veffer, Jack. My 2 Cents Worth. (1991) pp. 263–264
Hans Zoell, Error Collector
Hans Zoell was born on May 20, 1906 on a farm in Rhineland, Germany. During his early years, he had to work very hard at the farm to help his large family. His father wanted him to be a farmer; however, at age seventeen, Hans left the farm for Düsseldorf, where he went into apprenticeship and studied electrical engineering at school in the evenings.
In 1928 Hans emigrated to Canada and, until 1932, because of hard times all around, he started to take on odd jobs, such as carpentry and electrical repairs. Most of his spare time was devoted to collecting stamps and by 1935 he had accumulated quite a bit of stock, enough to establish himself in the stamp business. A year later he added his collection of foreign coins to the store stock. In 1938 he got married.
He first got involved in the printing business after World War II, when he had the opportunity to acquire a small print shop. In 1954 he opened up a hobby shop called “Phila-Coin Co.” All his hard work took its toll and he was taken ill. First a stroke and a few months later a mild heart attack. Hans took a rest for a number of years. In 1965 he came back on the scene with his first issue of Unusual Canadian Coins. He predicted a great future for that field and indeed pioneered in that area of numismatic. Error coins became his specialty. In 1966 he changed the name of the publication to U.N.O., Unusual Numismatic Objects. Health problems, again, forced him to give up business and collectors across Canada and the U.S. shared the grief of the Publication’s demise.
Early in 1969 Hans moved to Toronto and set up business once again under the name Hobby Publications at 92 Jarvis Street. From there he published The Kayak.
For many years he was considered the authority on the irregularity hobby. He was the author of many catalogues and author of the reference book on the subject. He was a warm, generous and loyal friend and he was sadly missed by his fellow collectors when he died in 1983.
While Hans was publisher/printer of The Kayak, a young man by the name of John Regitko was Editor and First Vice-President, while Bill English was President.
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The Charlton Standard Catalogue of Canadian Coins 58th edition 2004     pp. 384–6
CHARLTON-ZOELL VARIETY CATALOGUE
After several false starts we have started again, this time we will complete the task. That said here is the grand overall concept. Over the next four or five years, with each successive Standard, starting with the 58th edition, we will add approximately 40 pages on varieties to each catalogue. At the end of the development period we will have a 200-page catalogue of varieties that has been built, priced and researched. Therefore, if a decision is made to separate the varieties section of the Standard, there will be sufficient depth of information for the book to stand alone. To do this we need your help. Over the next few months we will open a variety page on our web site with posting facilities.
Contributors to the Variety Section
Jack Altenburg, Ted Bailey, Gerald Beaudet, Paul Bellmore, Terry Campbell, Brian Cornwell, Scott Cornwell, Morris Furball, Alain Gallo, Patrick Glassford, Paul Glover, B. Gravestone, Jack Griffin, Bill Hall, Joe Kennedy, Marion Krause, Serge Laramee, Ken Potter
INTRODUCTION
Since the 5th edition of the Zoel Variety Catalogue in 1970, except for a few good articles in the CNA Journal, very little has been published on varieties in Canada. The complete opposite is true in the United States where dozens of books are in print. Some in their fourth and fifth editions. We are behind in research on minting varieties here in Canada.
Hans Zoell, starting in the early 1960s, was the pioneer of Canadian varieties, but with his retirement and the closing of the Hobby Press in the mid-1970s, variety information ground to a slow crawl. It is with this first 40 pages of the Charlton-Zoell Catalogue that we hope to change this crawl to a walk, then into a trot, and if we are diligent into a run. We will be able to accomplish this if we study the works written by such U.S. notables as E. G. Jewett, Alan Herbert,John A. Wexler, and Bill Fivaz and J. T. Stanton, and carefully adapting their research to Canadian minting varieties, and through this we can make up for lost time.
The main foundation of the U.S. minting varieties is the PDS, three division identification system introduced by Jewett, revised first by Herbert, and refined by him over his five editions of “Official Price Guide to Mint Errors.”
The system breaks the minting process down into three basic areas: 1) The planchet, 2) The Die, and 3) The stride. The following pages illustrate a few examples of the over 400 classes that we must eventually cover. lt is here, in the following pages, we start with the die and strike divisions
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The CN Journal Vol. 52 No. 09 November 2007       pp. 494–7
THE CHANGING “STANDARD” by Dan Gosling F.C.N.A., #15627
[excerpt page 494]
The 58th edition included for the first time ever a 40-page section on varieties, a category which had long been missed. The variety section was added as the first step towards the publication of a new Charlton-Zoell Variety Catalogue. Cross purchased the rights to the ground-breaking, but now out of-date publications of Hans Zoell in the early 1970s.
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The CN Journal Vol. 56 No. 8 (October 2011) p. 461
RoyAl Writings by Alan Roy, #17134
Zoell’s Simplified Grading Guide
In the 1960s, coin grading was a very imprecise activity. A single coin could garner a handful of grades, even from the same individual. No standard had yet been offered for grading Canadian coins.
By 1965, three different Canadian coin grading guides were on the market. One was Hans Zoell’s The Simplified Grading Guide for the Coins of Canada and Newfoundland. Its goal was to make coin grading easier and more consistent by introducing a numeric scale.
Zoell began dealing in coins in 1936. When the Second World War cut off his supply of coins, he purchased and operated a small printing company. In 1955, he combined both avocations and began publishing numismatic books.
His pocket-sized Grading Guide was designed to be an accurate and easy-to-use guide for assessing and describing the condition of Canadian and Newfoundland decimal coins. All types are illustrated in clear, black and white photographs, with areas of wear highlighted in red. This was an improvement over competing guides, which used line drawings instead.
Zoell introduced in this book a new numeric system, dubbed the “progressive grading scale” to describe the condition of a coin. It was based on a scale from zero for uncirculated, to fifty for good, with other descriptive terms arranged at five-point intervals in between.
He seemed to have high hopes for his new system. A summary of the progressive grading scale was included in several issues of Unusual Canadian Coins, a periodical published by Zoell, devoted to coin varieties.
This wasn’t the first numeric system developed to grade coins. Joseph Hooper published an article in the February 1892 issue of The Numismatist describing a grading system using Roman numerals. In 1949, William Sheldon, in his book Early American Cents, proposed a numeric scale based on the condition of cents and their relative values.
Although Zoell actively promoted his own system, James Charlton began using Sheldon’s numeric scale in his 1979 edition of the Standard Catalogue of Canadian Coins. Today, the Sheldon system is the standard used throughout the United States and Canada.
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The CN Journal Vol. 56 No. 9 (November 2011) p. 542
Letters to the Editor
As I read Alan Roy’s October article “Zoell’s Simplified Grading Guide” it reminded me that back in the 1960s I had helped Hans with writing the introduction for this booklet. Recently, that connection influenced a fellow, who was writing an article about Hans, in asking me for anecdotes about Zoell. At that time, I put my thoughts into this letter of reply which is offered here for the interest of those who never met Hans Zoell:
Hello Marc:
I knew Hans Zoell in Regina during the 1960s. At that time, trading as Phila-Coin, he held mail auctions of Canadian decimal coins and I was an active bidder. He also operated Hobby Publishing, a small printing operation in the basement of an old building on the edge of downtown.
When I’d visit, Hans was always generous with his time and he took pleasure in showing me some unusual things. I remember, in particular, seeing some fantastic Victoria silver 5-cent error coins. They were so misshapen that mint employees must have saved them as curiosities. Hans was a big man with thin hair and with eye glasses that had a jeweler’s loupe attached, so he could closely inspect coins. As you know error coins were one of his greatest interests.
I remember having found a Canadian 1944 five-cent coin with a die break across the date. I’d taken it to Hans to show him, and he was delighted with it. I believe he photographed it and used the picture in one of his books. He did all the publication work himself. He had a large old-style professional photographer’s camera – one that had a wooden body. His text was printed on an IBM Selectric typewriter. He would photograph the text; enlarge portions such as headers and cut and paste to create originals for the pages, which he then reproduced on a small hand-fed press.
Around 1963 or ’64, Hans was working on a revision to his simplified grading guide, and he asked me to write the introduction for it. Being a European, Hans felt his written English wasn’t adequate to express what needed to be said. I wrote something for him and in appreciation he presented me with a dozen copies of the booklet and said, “I put your name on it too!” I’ve always laughed about that, because he spelled my first name as Barry instead of Barrie. Over time, I was never able to sell any of the booklets. Still, Hans meant well and I cherished him as a friend.
I’m not able to answer some of the questions you have asked with respect to varieties. I was never a collector of variety coins, so I don’t know why collectors didn’t follow the catalogue system Hans developed. It seemed straightforward to me, at the time. He was a pioneer in that part of the hobby. As well, I do not know why there was a gap from 1960 to 1970 in his published material on varieties.
I recall dropping in at Hans’ basement print shop early one Christmas Eve, and he gave me a very small glass of straight whisky along with a genuine expression of friendship. It’s been more that forty years since then, but that’s how I like to remember him.
I hope my recollections may help you with your project.
Bon chance, Barrie Renwick
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The CN Journal Vol. 57 No. 4 (May 2012) p. 251
RoyAl Writings by Alan Roy, #17134
Zoell’s Unusual Canadian Coins
After two world wars and a depression, interest in coin collecting was at a nadir. But as veterans returned from overseas and the economy continued its upswing, the “hobby of Kings” was experiencing a resurgence.
The new collectors, unlike those of the turn of the century, were less interested in the tokens and medals of Breton’s era. They tended to look to more familiar currency: decimal coins. The cents, dimes, and dollar coins circulating at the time became the basis for many new collections. As more joined the hobby, decimal coins were more closely scrutinized for varieties. Many researchers began writing about their discoveries, but the name most closely associated with variety collecting was Hans Zoell.
Zoell was a stamp dealer located in Regina, Saskatchewan. When the stamp business slowed down because of the Second World War, he purchased a printing company to supplement his income. In 1953, he began a new coin and stamp business called the Phila-Coin Co.
He soon located both businesses in the same building and began publishing his own coin catalogues. His best known were the Major and Minor Coin Varieties catalogues. In November of 1965, Zoell published the first issue of a new monthly periodical called Unusual Canadian Coins. He described it as the “magazine devoted to numismatics – including varieties, oddities, errors.”
In the premiere issue, Zoell discusses the benefits of collecting errors and varieties. He mentions that collectors of varieties would not encounter the “abrupt end” that stymies other coin collectors. They would not end up with a few empty holes in their albums because of rarity or great cost. Also, since the decimal series had no foreseeable end, completing a collection was unlikely.
His new magazine covered all aspects of the field. He wrote about the current happenings in the Canadian Numismatic Variety Collectors Association (C.N.V.C.A.) and Collectors of Numismatic Errors (C.O.N.E.). Close-up photographs of new varieties, errors, and other “numismatic oddities” discovered by himself and his readers encompassed several pages of each issue.
Zoell’s magazine folded after three years. Interest in varieties, however, continues to this day, with listings being added to Charlton’s Standard Catalogue since the 2004 edition in a section titled the “Charlton-Zoell Variety Catalogue.”
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Canadian Errors and Varieties Numismatic Association www.cevna.com (visited August 23, 2012)
Hans Zoell – A Biography
By Henry Nienhuis
Hans Zoell  [1906 - 1982]    CNA  LM30
Hans Zoell was born on May 20th 1906 in Rheinland Germany, the eldest son of eleven children. At the age of seventeen, he was apprenticed as a journeyman in the city of Düsseldorf. Hans continued his education, taking electrical engineering at night school.
In 1928 Hans emigrated to Canada and settled in Regina Sask., living with his aunt. He worked in his profession until 1932 when the great droughts hit the Midwest. He survived by working odd jobs and kept busy during this time by making the rounds picking up stamps from offices and building caretakers. This enabled him to accumulate a nice stock of stamps and soon he was selling his surplus to wholesale dealers in the U.S. 
In 1935, he established a Stamp and Supply business, a year later added foreign coins from his personal collection.
Hans married in 1938 and raised four children three boys and one girl.
When WWII put an end to trade with Europe and Great Britain, Hans was forced again the look for an alternate way to make a living. Although he lacked direct experience in the field, Hans took an opportunity to purchase a small printing company and kept the stamp business as a sideline.
In 1953 Hans returned to the coin and stamp business opening “Phila-Coin Co” which was very active in the field of coin varieties. He was also a dedicated collector of error/variety coins, painstakingly photographing and documenting the varieties. In the early 1960’s Hans combined his two businesses by publishing Canadian Coin and Paper Money catalogues as well as his famous Coin Varieties catalogues. 
As a result of ill health, he sold his coin business in 1963. This allowed him to concentrate on error/variety collecting, soliciting and cataloguing variety coins from other collectors, and publishing his catalogues. In November 1965 he began publishing a regular newsletter “Unusual Canadian Coins” which changed names to “Unusual Numismatic Objects” (UNO) in September 1966 and continued until October 1968. 
Hans was one of the founders of the Canadian Numismatic Variety Collectors Association (C.N.V.C.A) and was active in its American counterparts.
Early in 1969 Hans moved to Toronto, opening a coin shop and publishing business “Hobby Publications” located at 92 Jarvis St. where he published the last edition of his Minor Coin Varieties catalogue. During the next couple of years Hans assisted the Coin Irregularities Association of Canada (CIAC) by publishing their monthly newsletter, “The Kayak”, from January 1971 to April 1972, when he moved back to Regina.
After an extended illness, Hans Zoell, died on December 23, 1982. The collector's collector, Zoell shunned the numismatic spotlight, but contributed so much.
LISTING OF CATALOGUES published by Hans Zoell
Simplified Catalog of Canadian - Newfoundland Coins & Paper Money
1962    1st  Edition 1962-63   2nd  Edition
1963-64   3rd  Edition 1965    4th  Edition
Premium Catalog - Prices Paid for Coins. Canada Nfld & USA
1961-62   7th  Edition
1963    8th  Edition
1966-67   10th  Edition
Canadian Coin - Variety Catalog
1960-61   1st  Edition*
1961    1st  Edition*
1962    2nd  Edition
*Both Issues are titled 1st  Editions
Minor Coin Varieties
1965 Part Two   3rd  Edition
1968    4th  Edition  Supplement to the 3rd  Edition
1970    5th  Edition Supplement to 3rd  and 4th  Editions
Major Coin Varieties
1965 Part One   3rd  Edition
1966-67   4th  Edition
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Hans married 1938 (Vera Mary December 12, 1911 – February 20, 2000): Four children: Bob (three children) in Los Angeles, Don (December 21, 1938; three children) living in Edmonton, Paul (deceased 1980s) in Regina and Jeannette (three children) in Calgary.
12 grand children (three in each family).
Don and Paul as pressmen, Bob doing the photography, lay-out and make-ready work, while Jeanette did correspondence and circular typing
Residence: 1950s: 2471 McDonald St, Regina
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Hans Zoell Timeline


May 20, 1906

Birth, Rhineland, Germany

1923

apprenticeship in the City of Duesseldorf

1928

Immigrated to Regina, employed in profession of electrical engineering

1932

digging gardens, doing carpenter repair work, odd electrical repair jobs, etc.

1935

Formed stamp and supply business

1936

Added foreign coins to stamp business

1938

Married

dawn of World War II

Purchased Multi-Lith printing press

1953

Started Phila-Coin Co. with partner Elizabeth Kadannek

1960

25th Anniversary Shinplaster 25 cents trade token

Feb. 1960

“Small “9s” on Canadian Dime” Numismatic Scrapbook Magazine

1961

First edition 1961 variety catalogue of Canadian coins : fully illustrated and priced. – 1st ed.

 

1961

First edition 1961 variety catalogue of Canadian coins : fully illustrated and priced. – 1st ed. : second printing

 

1962

Canada coin variety catalog : fully illustrated and priced. – 2nd ed.

 

1962

Simplified catalogue of Canadian, Newfoundland coins and paper money. – 2nd ed.

 

1963

Stroke

 

October 1963

Sold Phila-Coin Co. to Roy Miller

 

1963

Visited Germany

 

1964

Simplified catalogue of Canadian, Newfoundland coins and paper money : including New Brunswick, Nova Scotia and Prince Edward Island. – 3rd ed.

 

1965

Canadian Numismatic Variety Collectors Association
 (CNVCA) Honourary President

 

1965

Canada major coin varieties including Newfoundland. – 3rd ed. : part one

 

1965

Canada minor coin varieties. – 3rd ed. : part two

 

1965

Simplified catalogue of Canadian, Newfoundland coins and paper money. – 4th ed.

 

1965

Simplified grading guide for the coins of Canada and Newfoundland.

 

November 1965

Unusual Canadian Coins No. 1

 

December 1965

“unreasonable Attitude”Unusual Canadian Coins No. 2

 

1966

Canada major coin varieties. – 4th ed.

 

January 1966

“Birth of MINOR Varieties” Unusual Canadian Coins No. 3

 

October 1966

C.N.V.C.A. Presidents Award

 

January 17, 1968

“‘Unusual’ Coins Present Ideal Hobby Opportunity” Coin World

 

1968

Canada minor coin varieties. – 4th ed.

 

1968

Sale of all rights to publications to Charlton Coin and Stamp

 

October 23, 1968

“‘Zoell Issues Final UNO Magazine” Coin World

 

1969

Moved to 92 Jarvis Street, Toronto ON

 

?

Moved to Ryerson building

 

1970

Canada minor coin varieties. – 5th ed.

 

January 1971

“Wrong view on Canadian coins” – The Kayak : Vol. 1, no. 1

 

March 1971

“Re-entry, re-cut, die-shift, deterioration” – The Kayak : Vol. 1, no. 3

 

July 1971

“Double-sided uniface coins” – The Kayak : Vol. 1, no. 6 - 7

 

November 1971

Asked to be relived from duties as Editor, The Kayak

 

Early 1970s

Moved back to Regina, purchase house with proceeds of sale of business in Toronto.

 

December 1974

“Re-entry, re-cut, re-shift, deterioration” – The CN Journal : Vol. 19, no. 11

 

December 23, 1982

Date of death, Interned at Riverside Memorial Park Cemetery
815 Assiniboine Avenue East NW, City of Regina. 94G Plot 14 Lot B

 

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Questions:
What is Hans’ middle name?              John?
Mrs. Zoell name and date of birth?    Vera Mary Zoell, December 12, 1911 (Rouleau SK)
What was her maiden name?              Ursulescu
What is the birth date of:                    Don:    December 21, 1938
                                                            Paul :   __________________
Bob:    April 13, 1940 (bobzoell@earthlink.net)
Jeanette:          __________________

Long time companion                         Elizabeth (Lisa or Liz) Kadannek. Lisa’s husband owned the Regina Book Exchange 1829 South Railway St.
Why did Hans move to Toronto?       Invited for possibility to produce catalogue. Moved into Jarvis St. building briefly then Ryerson Institute building before selling out and moving back to Regina.
Did he lose a leg and if so, when?      Yes. (almost lost the other leg as well before dying)
Where did he keep his coins?             Coin and stamp store
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Interview with Don Zoell, August 28, 2012
Stamp shop: Sterling Stamp Shop (2nd floor in the Sterling building - since demolished)
Calendar printed on Charley Libels 1250 Multi-Lith press
Produced Larry Lasque (sp?) Television Guide printing circa 1967
Purchased Rotaprint R30-90 approximately 1949. Prior to 1939 Hans printed on a small hand press.
Don remembers telling his Dad that his varieties were nothing more than flyspeck numismatics.
Christmas cards with different coins on the cover were once prepared and printed (circa 1964) but did not sell hardly at all. The colour separations were obtained from specialists in Regina. (wish I could see some of these!)
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From Bob Zoell, Aug 31, 2012
Daniel,
o  URSULESKU Mother's maiden name.
o  My birthdate is April 13, 1940 ...See my webpage www.bobzoell.com for fun and entertainment

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A few notes on Bob Zoell:
He remembers playing with left-over strips of paper from the cutter and gathering envelopes for nearby businesses and soaking off the stamps for resale by his Dad. Earning enough money was always a struggle for his Dad’s businesses.
www.pictureboxinc.com/artists-authors/bob-zoell
Bob Zoell has had a 45-year art career in Los Angeles and has been the recipient of the Pollack/Krasner and the Adolph Gottlieb Foundation grants, as well as serving as visiting faculty in advanced painting at UCLA. He has shown his work and lectured in Japan, France and throughout the U.S. He is also a regular contributor to the New Yorker, with seven covers to his credit.
http://www.pandahi.com/1007698818.html
Born in Regina, Canada in 1940, Zoell's artistic career began in his father's small printing shop where at the early age of 12 he would set typo and make litho plates of his art after school. This work instilled a life-long love of language and letters, which later became a dominating theme in his graphic and fine art career.
In the late 50s and early 60s, after leaving school, Zoell worked at various commercial art-related jobs including a sign shop, an outdoor advertising firm, a publishing house and a design studio. In 1962, the artist left his native Calgary with his family and resettled in sunny Los Angeles where he was offered an Art Director position with Saul Bass and Associates. In 1970, Zoell rented a loft space with the intent of investigating painting. According to Zoell, "After exhausting what few freedoms illustration offered, I became aware of Reductive and Abstract art by artists such as Malevich, Pollack, Newman, et al. I felt a need to investigate this new territory. In my studio, I explored the formal rectangle in my paintings and a whole new direction that offered new challenges."
In the late 80s he joined Ace Gallery, a vangaurd contemporary art space in Los Angeles, and developed a series of large "spot" paintings. "I would locate a spot on a field and mark it to celebrate that descision," said Zoell. "This cool and disciplined approach usually ended up mocking itself." Zoell's focus on reductive thinking led him to the realization that he could apply the tenets of minimalism to language. While he had always used language in his work, he expanded his imagery to fragments and punctuation marks.
Throughout the 80s and 90s, Zoell traveled around the world showing his art at such institutions as Fundacio Joan Miro, Barcelona, Spain; PS 122, New York City; Centre Georges Pompidou, Paris, France and the Los Angeles County Museum. Among his many accomplishments are prestigious grants form the Adolph and Esther Gottlieb Foundation and the Pollack-Krasner Foundation, respectively. He also served as a visiting faculty member at the University of California, Los Angeles.
Director of Cultural Affairs for the San Francisco Arts Commission (SFAC) Luis R. Cancel is pleased to announce the installation of "BFILRYD" (Bird + FLY), a new public artwork by acclaimed abstract painter Bob Zoell at San Francisco International Airport. A regular contributor to The New Yorker, Zoell has created seven iconic covers and has lectured and participated in exhibitions at prestigious contemporary art institutions around the world. Combining his lifelong passion for language and birds, Zoell transforms the secure connector between Terminal 3 and International Terminal Boarding Area G into a playful, idyllic world of singing birds sitting on branches composed form letters and punctuation marks. The top and bottom frosted glass panels feature airplanes and typography, rendered in a simplified graphic style. According to the artist, “The letters and punctuation marks create a curious code of abstract icons that become a poetic statement. These happy marks, I feel, create a delightful and positive Airport environment for all ages.”
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A few notes on Don Zoell:
Moved to Calgary to work at xxx and then the Bank of Canada.
Started
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A few notes on Vera Zoell:
Moved to Los Angelos and worked as a Nurse. Moved to Calgary
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Elizabeth Wilhelmina Kadannek, Date of Burial: June 05, 1996
**************
The CN Journal Vol. 01 No. 07 July 1956
New Members
1193 KADANNEK, Mrs. K, 1829 South Railway St., Regina, Sask.
**************
CNJournalV02N08August1957.pdf
OFFICIAL PHOTOGRAPH OF THE 1957 REGINA ROUND-UP
Front Row (Left to Right)
W. J. King, Winnipeg
D. Zoell, Regina
Second Row
Mrs. E. Kadannek, Regina
Third Row
K. McDonald, Regina
C. Spatari, Rossland, B.C.
H. Zoell, Regina
R. Zoell, Regina
R. Miller, Duval, Sask.
**************
The CN Journal Vol. 04 No. 08 August 1959
Reinstatements
1193 KADANNEK, Mrs. K, Box 123, Regina, Sask.
**************
Coin World January 12, 1961 p. 3
First Edition of Canadian Variety Catalog Sells Out
“Zoell is anxious to have information regarding varieties not listed in his new catalog, and solicits the, assistance of all numismatists. He asks for a complete description of the unlisted varieties and an opportunity to photograph the coin for future editions of the catalog. Authorities who aided Zoell in the preparation of the first edition include Martin M. Watts, Oliver St. Aubin, Stan. Cowie, Roy Miller, Nick Serniack, C. C. Tannahill, E. B. Kadannek, W. G. Latta, Norman Carlson and S. Meyers.”
**************
The CN Journal Vol. 08N09September1963.pdf
Change of Address
1193 KADANNEK, Mrs. E., Box 62, Regina, Sask.
**************
The CN Journal Vol. 08N11November1963.pdf
Ray Miller of Regina has taken over Phila-Coin Company from Hans Zoell and Mrs. E. Kadannek, who have operated the firm for some years. Ray is well known in numismatic circles, and is a frequent attender at Conventions. Hans, his many friends will be glad to know, is continuing his work in the numismatic field, as he and Mrs. Kadannek are continuing to operate Hobby Publishing Company.
**************
Unusual Canadian Coins No. 1 (November 1965)
ADVERTISING: E. Kadannek
**************
Unusual Canadian Coins No. 8 (June 1966) pp. 1, 4, 20
“SHORT BIOGRAPHY
...In 1953 I opened up busines in the hobby line again, including coins. I named it “Phila-Coin Co.” taking in Elizabeth Kadannek as a partner.”
**************
The CN Journal Vol. 28N02February1983.pdf          p. 57
HANS ZOELL C.N.A. LM 30
May 20th, 1906 -1982 December 23rd.
Hans married in 1938 and raised four children, Don, Bob, Jeanette and Paul. Elizabeth (Lisa) Kadannek remained his partner in his move to Toronto and back to Regina, looking after him the last few years.
**************
The Leader-Post December 24, 1982 p. 81
Zoell–
... Mr. Zoell is survived by a good friend, Elizabeth Kadannek.
http://www.regina.ca/residents/cemeteries/cemetery-plot-search/online-cemetery-search/results.htm?page=1&lastName=Kadannek&firstName=&cemetery=&yearOfDeath=&ageOfDeath=&yearInterred=


Last Name

First Name(s)

Age at Death

Date of Birth

Date of Death

Date of Burial

Cemetery

Block-Plot-Lot

KADANNEK

ELIZABETH WILHELMINA

 

 

 

Jun 05, 1996

Riverside Memorial Park Cemetery

94G-14-B

KADANNEK

JOHN

64

 

 

Jan 25, 1961

Riverside Memorial Park Cemetery

15G-04-B

**************
The Leader-Post - Jan 23, 1961
http://news.google.com/newspapers?nid=w9EjUEod0xMC&dat=19610123&printsec=frontpage&hl=en
Kadannek - Sunday, January 22, Mr. John Kadannek, age 64 years, dearly beloved husband of Mrs. Elizabeth Kadannek of 3306 Portnal Ave. Mr. Kadannek is survived by his wife and two sisters, Mrs. Pauline Goodrich of Virden Man., Mrs. Olga McFadden of Vulcan, Alta. Funeral services will be held at Speers Funeral Chapel Wednesday, January 25 at 3 p.m. The Rev. Rickhert will officiate and interment will be in Riverside Memorial Park. Arrangements in care of Speers Funeral Chapel.
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http://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/sterling-trust-bdg-regina-saskatchewan-rppc
Sterling Trust Building postcard (next to Westman Chambers building), Regina, Saskatchewan [Image not available] Sold Date: 07/17/2008
Channel: Online Auction. Source: eBay
Category: Books, Paper & Magazines
You are bidding on a vintage photo postcard of Westman Chambers Sterling Trust Building in Regina Saskatchewan. It was used. It has a small tear near the bottom. This is a great old photo postcard! See scan for details. If you have any questions let me know, I would be happy to help!
The winning bidder agrees to pay 2.00 shipping within the United States. Within the US I accept paypal and money order, checks take 10 days to clear before shipping. International bidders agree to pay 3.00 shipping. International bidders I accept paypal bidpay and international money order only. Second photo ships free for domestic and international bidders so check out my other auctions. Happy bidding!
The free listing tool. List your items fast and easy and manage your active items.
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(N.E. Corner 11th Ave. and Rose St., Regina Sask.)
Sterling Trust Bldg (originally the Dominion Trust Co.)
next to Westman Chambers
http://www.multiculturalcanada.ca/node/177635/fit?display=full
Dominion Trust Co.
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http://dictionaryofarchitectsincanada.org/architects/view/1337
DOMINION TRUST CO.,
Rose Street at 11th Avenue, 1911 (C.R., xxv, 24 May 1911, 62, t.c.)
Storey, Edgar Manley
(1863-1913)
STOREY & VAN EGMOND
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The Architectural Heritage of Storey and Van Egmond:
A Preliminary Assessment
Report for Saskatchewan Culture, Youth and Recreation, Regina
March 31, 2004
Ross Herrington M.A., M.Sc., P.Eng.
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http://www.tpcs.gov.sk.ca/StoreyVanEgmond
Storey and Van Egmond Building List
1912-19  Dominion Trust Co. Building (Sterling Trust) (addition 1913?) (demolished)
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Google newspaper archive search: Morning Leader Sep 28, 1918 p.23
BUYS DOMINION TRUST HERE
The Dominion Trust building, corner of Rose street and Eleventh avenue. .. one of the finest office blocks In the city, has changed hands. The Sterling Trust company has purchased the property for $80,000 and will move their offices from Soarth street into the offices on the first floor now occupied by the Bank of British North America. The bank will remain in the building for some time yet, at last until the amalgamation with the Bank of Montreal, which is expected to be consummated about the end of next month. Whether amalgamation will have immediate effect on the Regina branch is not known, but the officials stated last evening they would be at the old stand for some time yet, anyhow.
The Dominion Trust building, a six story structure. was erected in 1911, five stories being completed that year; and one more added In 1912. The purchase price is considered to be low, as the building could not be erected today for anything under $150,000.
http://peel.library.ualberta.ca/postcards/PC012865.html
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http://news.google.com/newspapers?id=GatUAAAAIBAJ&sjid=ozsNAAAAIBAJ&pg=4192,4831172&dq=1829-south-railway-st&hl=en
The Regina Book Exchange
Phone LA 2-5433
1829 South Railway St.
Book Exchange Building - Regina
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The Leader-Post - Aug 28, 1954
Announcement of Change of Address
Regina Book Exchange
1829 South Railway St.
P.O. Box 7 - Phone 5433
Regina
We also operate
Empire Press - Phone 4032
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http://www.georgemanzcoins.com/pdf/auctioncatalogue-0410.pdf
MERCHANT’S SCRIP
214. Phila-Coin 25 cents scrip.
Issued by Phila-Coin Company in 1960.
Sent to all good customers to celebrate their Silver Jubilee of service to hobbyists. Good for 25 cents for a period of one year. Serial number 3200. Signed by E. (Lisa) Kadannek, President and Hans Zoell, General Manager.
Only 5000 printed.
Minimum Bid $2 $5.
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